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Thread: Interview Preperation Material

  1. #1
    Pandilex
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    Default Interview Preperation Material

    List here some of the things you think you will need to know for the interview. People who've had interviews in the past, can you post some ideas of what we potentials should try to study up on before the interview?

    I'm particularly interested to know the best way of answering the question "Student X is misbehaving, what do you do?" "What happens when they continue to be disruptive?"


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    The best way to answer it is to say what you'd do in that situation!

    (edited for typo)

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    > The best was to answer it is to say what you'd do in that situation!

    WOAH! Now that I hadn't thought of

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    Hi Pandelix! I'm sooo much in the same boat as you when it comes to this interview!!

    i got this from http://karatethejapaneseway.com/arti...interview.html

    If you are a single guy the situational question will likely be something about unruly students and how to deal with discipline. They will say something like: “There is a rowdy boy in your class who has ignored your instructions. What do you do? What do you do?!”

    The wrong answer is: “Well, I just grab that kid by his nostril hair and tell him that he better straighten up and fly right or by George I'll clobber him!”

    The right answer is: “Wow. Y'know teaching kids can be a real challenge. Sometimes their shenanigans really can get me going. But I learned that it is important to be patient with youngsters. They've got a lot of growin' to do and I have to keep that in mind all the time. I understand that the ALT job involves 'team-teaching'. I think that it is a super idea to have two teachers working cooperatively in the same room. In that kind of a situation I would definitely talk with the Japanese teacher and see what kind of strategy could be arranged so that we can get that kid back on track. There might be other considerations, both cultural and societal, that I am not aware of. The key point is though, that I wouldn't just 'leap into action' but I would take the time necessary to try to get at the root of the trouble and then work with my teammates to find positive solutions.”

    You can stop gagging now but that is the kind of answer you might think about using. Now, you don't have to start talking like a slack-jawed reminiscing old farm hand who talks about how those young'ins sure can act like a bunch of whippersnappers but this question is testing your ability to play well with the other kids. Also, they want to see if you are quick to impose a “Western” solution to a Japanese discipline problem. What they don't tell you in the interview is that lots of Japanese teachers just bash the kid on the head for being disruptive. You, however, are expected to solve problems like a true cultural ambassador, full of cheerfulness, open-mindedness, diplomacy, and patience.
    Hope it somewhat helps....lets help each other get this JET thing over and done with!!! we can do it....i feel the power..hehe

    seeya!
    Hanzo

  5. #5
    Pandilex
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    Thanks Hanzo, that is perfect! Just what I was looking for!

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    Senior Member bigredgoofball's Avatar
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    You can usually count on Humiliation and Dishonor as powerful tools, too. Be creative, within the bounds of the classroom, and avoiding assault. Perhaps you could point out how childish and "young" the disruptive behavior is to the other students. That usually works.

    Then there's alswys the "Looming Gaijin" factor. Of course, I'm 6'3", so maybe that works a bit better fior me than average.
    "Apparently, this is the price I pay for years of screwing with Super-Science."
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    Heheh. That answer.

    AKA Waffling

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    Brush up on general UK and Japan knowledge. Apart from that, just relax, be yourself and answer honestly!
    "If you've got [a penis], or access to one, take a good look at it this evening and ask yourself: how can this possibly be the work of a sane God?"

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    Senior Member bigredgoofball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENAY
    Heheh. That answer.

    AKA Waffling

    Well, you *could* hit them with a waffle iron, but it leaves pretty distinctive marks.
    "Apparently, this is the price I pay for years of screwing with Super-Science."
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigredgoofball
    Well, you *could* hit them with a waffle iron, but it leaves pretty distinctive marks.
    That's why a week or two before hand, you start rumours of sightings of someone attacking with waffle-irons. A dangerous criminal, perhaps, or a superhero like Captain Wafflefist. Then you blame this fictional entity.
    All through the night
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    I'd just like to remind you that interviews are quite different between consulates, and very different between the UK and the USA (and other countries I imagine).

    I read lots of warnings and advice that turned out to be completely off the mark for my UK interview. I got the impression everyone was pretty relaxed, and though they asked some tricky questions, there was never any attempt to put me "under pressure" or to try and shock me to see my reaction, as I'd read about on various websites and (nameless) forums.

    So, remember to check the location of the advice!

    Matt
    Mabushiii!!!

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    Just curious to hear some of the discrepancies between the USA & UK interviews that you noticed Matt~

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    Quote Originally Posted by socalDave
    Just curious to hear some of the discrepancies between the USA & UK interviews that you noticed Matt~
    This is something that I was interested in, as I had read in various places that US people were asked to demonstrate a lesson in their interview.

    You might find some more info here:

    http://www.ithinkimlost.com/modules....ewtopic&t=1507

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    Last year, SF Consulate applicants did not have to prepare a lesson.

    Just a (very good, IMO) suggestion: re-read your statement of purpose/ application essay before the interview. You might get asked questions relating to things you wrote inyour essay. Brush up and make sure you know what the interviewers are refering to.

    And please dress the part. It's a job interview, not a hang out session. Last year some people came to the interviews looking less than professional. Needless to say, I did not see them at the pre-depature meeting. Look neat and well groomed. If you don't have a suit, wear a nice pair of slacks or a nice skirt and top.

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    I didn't have to do a mock lesson, they just asked me situational questions which i answered to the best of my knowledge. they also asked me if there was anything I'd like to ask, I said no, but could I take a moment to say,

    "how important I feel programmes like JET are for developing the idea of a global community. teaching students around the world about other cultures only goes to further their understanding and acceptance of other people. It's an idea that JET seems to work hand in hand with and and idea that JET is getting across slowly to the Japanese students. "

    or words to that effect, anyway I basically told them what they wanted to hear, showed I had the motivation to believe in what JET stands for, not just english education, but the idea of building bridges and breaking walls. you put that kind of impression across and I'd say your likely to get in. I only have my experience to go on, but I'm here.

    just know your stuff and they will soon realise if you are suitable.
    "could you use a slave, you hairy bunch of Ishmolites?"
    www.oitajets.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigredgoofball
    You can usually count on Humiliation and Dishonor as powerful tools, too. Be creative, within the bounds of the classroom, and avoiding assault. Perhaps you could point out how childish and "young" the disruptive behavior is to the other students. That usually works.

    Then there's alswys the "Looming Gaijin" factor. Of course, I'm 6'3", so maybe that works a bit better fior me than average.
    Which makes exactly fuck all difference in real terms

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    Quote Originally Posted by David
    Quote Originally Posted by bigredgoofball
    You can usually count on Humiliation and Dishonor as powerful tools, too. Be creative, within the bounds of the classroom, and avoiding assault. Perhaps you could point out how childish and "young" the disruptive behavior is to the other students. That usually works.

    Then there's alswys the "Looming Gaijin" factor. Of course, I'm 6'3", so maybe that works a bit better fior me than average.
    Which makes exactly fuck all difference in real terms


    ....[sigh] If you have better suggestions, we're all ears, David.
    "Apparently, this is the price I pay for years of screwing with Super-Science."
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    Just a random question, in the interview do they ask you whether or not you prefer to work in a JHS or SHS?

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    They didn't at mine (New York City). Although I do think part of the reason I might have gotten JHS was because I mentioned having worked in my mom's classroom a lot, and she teaches ten-year-olds. So given that there are relatively few elementary school positions, they might have given me JHS. Or it might have been totally random.

    On the discipline thing, it really boils down to being able to peg what kind of people kids are. The embarrassment factor can work for some kids, but with others, it's useless. You need to be able to figure out what will work for each kid- just picking one method and trying to apply it universally won't work. Actually, I think one of the most useful pre-JET experiences I had, in terms of discipline and classroom stuff, was doing Army ROTC in college. Not because I make my kids drop and do push-ups or anything, but because the leadership experience helped me learn how to apply different methods to different people. The whole, huge emphasis on specific social customs, chain of command, timeliness and stuff didn't hurt, either. In a lot of ways, the Japanese society I've experienced here has a lot in common with that stuff.

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