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Thread: Your Japanese study routine?

  1. #1

    Default Your Japanese study routine?

    How many hours a day do you study Japanese? What do you study?
    Vocab drills? Review grammar? Practice Kanji? I have to be a little more structured in how I study if I want to pass JLPT 2.
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    VIP UPGRAYEDD's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    Kanji first thing in the morning. Next reviewing grammar points. Finish off with trying to read some articles at google news or tech blogs.
    You see, gentlemen, a pimp's love is very different from a square's...
    (郷に入っては郷に従え.)

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    VIP UPGRAYEDD's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    At least 2 hours worth of study Monday - Friday. Depending on my work schedule.

    On weekends I don't really study much. Just sit back and watch dramas or go to the capital and practice at bars.
    You see, gentlemen, a pimp's love is very different from a square's...
    (郷に入っては郷に従え.)

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    Senior Member vertigo_stick's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    Workdays usually study at least 2 hours.

    Lately I have been doing lots of Kanji study with my Kanji step book.

    When I was prepping for 2-kyuu, first I went through my 2-kyuu grammar book once (どんな時どう使う), trying to do 1 lesson each day I studied it (usually finished about 4 lessons a week). Then when I was done with one run through, I went back through it again. I actually only barely finished the first run-through in time for the test.

    I didn't study Kanji for 2-kyuu because I had a good handle on them, but I was studying kanji in general because I am a huge kanji nerd.

    I did practice tests whenever I wanted to test my progress. For last year's December test I did one in September, then another in November, then about 3 in the week prior to the actual test (though I skipped the listening section on two of those because my listening was pretty together at that point.)

    I think you have to make yourself focus on your weak points. I know that before the first time I took the JLPT (failed by about 9%) I let myself play too much in the stuff I was already decent at, and completely didn't prep for the reading section. After that failure (sub-40% score on reading/grammar) I bought, borrowed and used several books for grammar and reading prep.

    How will I study for JLPT1?

    -practice tests bi-monthly
    -どんな時どう使う grammar book (Which covers 1 and 2 kyuu)
    -watch more Japanese TV for listening prep
    -Finish my 4-kyuu Kanji Kentei book, then focus fully on JLPT1-covered kanji and vocab until the test.
    -Read more in general, starting with my 'A Japanese Reader' book and the comic books my friend lent me.

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    Slut kawaii_candie's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    woah, you guys are motivated... i really don't study at all besides watching dramas, eheh... i always want to but there always seems to be something better to do
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    Senior Member jandek's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    5 days a week (roughly) routine. Currently holding 2-Kyuu, trying for 1-Kyuu come the summer time. Anyone here taken the 漢字検定?

    Kanji
    - Go through about 25+ Kanji w/related vocabulary from the book Kanji in Context, which has all the Jouyou Kanji. When I finish the cycle, i start over from ichi and go through it again. I have never really bothered trying to learn anything beyond the Jouyou Kanji, but i feel like i have solid handle on them now after a few years of this.

    Reading
    - Novels are the way to go for getting real comprehension and being able to use what you are picking up. Manga is nice for learning lots of vocabulary, but that really only takes you so far, because the pictures are holding your mind back from trying as hard as it could. I would recommend anything by Murakami Haruki (currently reading スプートニクの恋人). He writes fairly in a straightforward style, but his plot elements and subject matter are consistently interesting and remind me more of Vonnegut than anything else i've found in the language.

    Vocabulary
    - Mostly just let it soak in from the reading, but sometimes i like to look at related lists of things, like all the school subjects, all the animals, all the weather words. It makes it nice.

    Writing
    - text a lot, write a lot of emails.

    Translate!
    - somewhere in your town there is someone who wants you to translate something into English for them for free. It helps them out and builds your portfolio. Make vocab lists for each translation project, and when you finish, organize them into coherent parts and memorize the hell out of them.

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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    Any book suggestions for kanji for someone who just passed 3kyu? My kanji knowledge really really blows. I would prefer a workbook because those keep me motivated.
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    VIP UPGRAYEDD's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    Kanji in Context with workbook vo. 1. Though it doesn't have questions per say.

    Intermediate Kanji Book series
    You see, gentlemen, a pimp's love is very different from a square's...
    (郷に入っては郷に従え.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by elleohelle View Post
    Any book suggestions for kanji for someone who just passed 3kyu? My kanji knowledge really really blows. I would prefer a workbook because those keep me motivated.
    I realise this is going to annoy some people, but: Heisig. If you want to learn kanji, go through Heisig. It made a MASSIVE difference to my Japanese.

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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    I didn't take 3-kyuu but I think I could pass it. Decided to skip it and just start studying for 2-kyuu. I started off with the Basic Kanji Book for Kanji. The 2nd vol. starts from 250-500 foundation kanji. Now I"m using the Kanzen Master Kanji book for Level 2 and trying to do 2 lessons a week. I've been using Minna no Nihongo Chuukyuu for grammar and stuff but I'm not a big fan of it. I probably study about 6-10 hours a week. I also do Anki every morning with vocab.

  11. #11

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    I spent daily 3 to four hour for learning japanese language. How long does it take to become fluent in Japanese? I am studying from this website.

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    Member Kerensa's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    I need to spend more time practicing my Japanese. I just have a very hard time finding a kanji book that actually works with me and then I have a hard enough time setting up my own lesson plan and sticking by it to practice those kanji.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerensa View Post
    I need to spend more time practicing my Japanese. I just have a very hard time finding a kanji book that actually works with me and then I have a hard enough time setting up my own lesson plan and sticking by it to practice those kanji.
    Me too. I think I'm just going to stick with smart.fm for kanji now.

    Quote Originally Posted by Taurus View Post
    I realise this is going to annoy some people, but: Heisig. If you want to learn kanji, go through Heisig. It made a MASSIVE difference to my Japanese.
    Someone recommended that series to me and I bought the first book but I couldn't really get into the author's method of memorization. I'm actually on my way to donate that book at a library that has an English section.

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    Senior Member Kuro2Flo's Avatar
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    I try to talk to friends in Japan as often as possible on Skype, and more often than not they will launch into super in dept discussions about topics I know nothing about. For instance, a friend was telling me about how her American boyfriend cheated on her, broke up with her, found a new Japanese girlfriend, and then went back to visit Japan with the new girl and never paid the original girlfriend back for a plane ticket. I had only a vague idea of what she was talking about, so after the convo I copied it and went through picking out different grammar points and kanji that I hadn't recognized during our discussion.

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    Senior Member Shankerbelle's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    I used to have one, it was on commute to and from work, and then when i was at work when no one was looking, so about hour 2-3 hours a day. But not anymore. Really want to get back into it though. I do have two 1 hour language exchange sessions every week though, but its mostly helping them with their English so cant really include that either.


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    Resident ewok wicket's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    I'm down to 30 minutes on livemocha.com a day, plus kakitori kun [on DS] when i have time [so maybe a couple of hours a week]. and emails to and from japanese friends for reading/writing practice.
    "Like anyone with a sliver of honesty in them I believe what I find I believe when I wake up each morning."
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    Senior Member ushanka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jandek View Post
    I would recommend anything by Murakami Haruki (currently reading スプートニクの恋人). He writes fairly in a straightforward style, but his plot elements and subject matter are consistently interesting and remind me more of Vonnegut than anything else i've found in the language.

    - text a lot, write a lot of emails.
    Because I'm taking Japanese classes right now, I pretty much just rely on those classes for a guide to my Japanese study, but I really agree with the two points made above by jandek: Murakami is your friend. His books use a lot of katakana and simplified grammar, as well as very contemporary language. I've noticed since I began trying to get through Murakami books in Japanese my reading ability has gotten a lot better. And the kanji in his books are pretty everyday. Not crazy compounds or something archaic you'd find in older novels (I tried reading Tanizaki once... bad idea...)

    Also, if you have Japanese friends, like jandek said, text or even better, IM with them! The quick back-and-forth that IM's necessitate are really good for practicing language. I took French about 4 years ago and the only practice I get with it is via facebook chat, and it's amazing how much language you're able to summon up in a rapid-fire situation like that. Because IM'ing is informal, too, you'll be able to pound out a lot of vocab/conversation practice with minimum pressure or criticism.

    One last tip that's helped me--

    When it comes to studying kanji, try and do some memorization in the morning (I practice just by writing lines of a certain kanji or compound), casually just flip through flashcards of said kanji throughout the day (while on the bus, waiting in line, chilling, etc.) and then test yourself that night.

    This method is what I do every time I have a new batch of kanji to learn, and the combination of passive learning (casual review) and focused writing practice (line drills) has helped me improve my kanji retention a lot.

    Hope that helps!

  18. #18
    Senior Member jandek's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    katie p, i know exactly what you mean about those turn of the 20th century authors. Recently I've been trying to read a lot more Natsume Soseki, and the kanji he uses for a lot of everyday phrases haven't been used in over 50 years. Unless you're bulking up to read the 万葉集, there's really no point in spending your time with anything written less than 30 years ago, especially if you're just looking to get in a little practice with the written language.

    IM is a good point. Also, one thing with texting I have noticed, sometimes you get the urge to wait until you're feeling in a "japanese" mood to respond, but it's best for everybody to just ignore that and go ahead with the messaging. builds character.

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    Senior Member Easy_money's Avatar
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    Default Re: Your Japanese study routine?

    My study routine consists of going to random snack bars and striking up conversations with oyaji and the remnants of sanjikais who roll in around 2am, piss ass drunk.

    Works well.

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    Senior Member ushanka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RomulusLupin View Post
    How are those books anyway? Kanji (especially writing) is definitely my weak point with Japanese studies, but those books looked a little fishy.

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