Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 56

Thread: Post your sucessful lessons here!

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default Post your sucessful lessons here!

    Hi,

    There are quite a few of us on board now with some experience in the Japanese classroom. There are scattered posts of good ideas, but it would be great to share them all in one place... then on the days when we are asked last minute to come up with something fab, we only need log on to our favourite daily procrastinating site ITIL to find something tried and tested!

    I will start with the the ideas that worked best in my schools so far.

    Chinese Whispers (the whisper game) - great for those practically mute students!

    Consequences - A girl's name, a boy's name, place, what he said, what she said, what happend in the end etc.... (in lines. Funniest story - line wins a sticker each... Bribery optional!)

    Battleships - my favourite so far - adaptable to almost any level and objective! (in the Pizza book and rules in Japanese to help you explain it to those JTEs who have difficulty understanding you sometimes!) Thanks to Mcristie for suggesting this! It has restored my genkiness in the classroom!

    Shiritori - Give each team a word to start with and they have to take it in turns to think of a word that starts with the last letter and so on. Points awarded depending on how many letters in word.
    I wasn't quite sure of the point of this game (educationally) but it keeps them occupied and they got excited about it for some reason! It is a Japanese game so they know it well already- needs no explanation.

    New Year's resolutions - I promise to listen to my teacher, I will try my best in..., I will try and eat less junk food/more healthy food.... etc Stickers for students with attempts to write and read out in English (yes it is that bad!), Also stickers for students with the confidence to read/tell their resolutions to the classs! Go on, who has the confidence! Girls against boys competition.

    I know elementary is miles easier but my "Guess what's in the stocking" game at Christmas was great! You could do this with objects in a feely bag (very infanty!) but fun! Get them to use all their senses except sight! I'm yet to adapt this to JHS but I think it could be done...

    Please add your ideas here! Onegaishimasu!
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Under House Arrest
    Posts
    1,092

    Default

    I am at a technical high school so if I suggested some of those games I would get laughed at.
    But this thread is a good idea Hannah.

    Also can some one put in the rules of the battleship game in the lessonplan section of this site. That one might go down well with my too-cool-for-school future mechanics.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Sure, will do! Battleships might appeal to your students as it is kinda technical! Grid references an' all!

    The majotity of us are JHS teachers and we are the one's who tend to find teaching in Japan the most challenging... High school and elementary school ALTs have the best success - going by the people I know. Obviously exceptions.. If this thread grows big enough maybe it can be divided into ES, JHS and HS.

    Looking forward to reading other people's success stories!

    PS Do you mean in Downloads? Can't find a lesson plan bit on the site!
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Under House Arrest
    Posts
    1,092

    Default

    Thanks Hannah.

    Yeah in downloads there is a lesson plan bit I think.

    Thanks again.

  5. #5

    Default

    This isn't a whole lesson, just an activity I use to start my optional english classes in Jnr high school:

    The students take home a teddybear / fluffy toy (each student in turn), and they have to write a diary entry for it. At the next class they have to read their diary entry as a speach and the class ask questions.

    Its good because they actually enjoy using English creativly, and their friends enjoy asking them difficult questions. I like it because they have to practice a range of skills - writing, speaking, listening.

    I bought 3 teddies (1 per class) and a notebook for each as a diary. The students named them (Nancy, Taro and Rabit) I think this made it a bit more fun for them...

    When the students want to use Japanese the JTE helps them put it into English. The speach + questions usually takes no more than 10 mins at the begining of the lesson. You do sometimes have to remind students to bring the teddy.

    I don't use it at elementary school, and I don't teach Snr high so don't know how it would go down at either of these...

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    I used to do this with 4,5 and 6 year olds in the UK!!! Great fun! Imagine if they could take some pictures (like Faustus' Wolvie!) and write captions for them?!! Cool idea, if you can get the humour across....
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  7. #7

    Default

    a couple of them have included pictures - so the diary is a bit like a scrap book. Thanks for the idea about picture + captions...

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    OK, another reasonably successful lesson (Come on senseis, keep up!!)

    This lesson was originally to introduce the idea of Habitat for Humanity (trip to India) but I will do that bit next time (follow up)

    JHS san nensei
    It went something like this:

    Warm up: A bit experimental for Japan but hey!
    Learning languages requires good co-ordination between the left and right hemisphere of the brain. So, BRAIN GYM is the answer here.. I used to start quite a few of my lessons in the UK with brain gym activities.

    Do you know "Spot the Dog" exercise? Put your left leg forward and your left arm back. Put your right leg back and your right arm forward... you get me??? Then jump and switch!! (so your left leg is now back, left arm forward, right leg forward and right arm back) It is quite difficult at first, but once you get the hand of it, it's easy... It required the left and right hand side of your brain to communicate, thus preparing you for learning a foreign language!

    Health warning: so not all students or teachers will co-operate. It helps if your class is quite genki and you need a good JTE who can understand your explanation in the first place!

    (NB:There are many other brain gym exercises!)

    Then, leaving the students standing behind their desks procede to play the line or row game. Ask questions. The student who answers can choose if their line or row sits down. I did this with pictures. What is this? (Things we use everyday- you will understand why in a min)

    Then the class are sitting and listening (ha ha!)

    Ask them what all these things have in common... If you are lucky a student may say "We use them everyday", or "life" or something to that effect. One cocky student said "They are all black and white pictures!!

    I made a worksheet with match the Japanese to the English. Get the kids to draw lines between the words in different coloured pens. This is "mind mapping". It will help their memories!

    The items on the list were:

    TV, Telephone, transport, Shelter, Food, Clothing, Water, etc etc

    You or the JTE can go through the correct answers if you wish.

    Then the kids have to think up 5 or 10 more things that they use everyday. They can use dictionaries.

    Ask the kids to share their ideas with you. (pah!) Force it out of them is more likely!

    If there is time, tell the students that they will be stranded on a desert island! What 5 things (from the lists) would they choose to take with them? I just about had time to start this before the bell went, so I set it as homework... Hopefull we can return to it next time... but I have a feeling there will be exams so may not get the chance, but it is a good opportunity to introduce the idea that not everybody has the basics in life. If you are part of a Habitat for Humanity groups or want to do some fundraising of some kind or even just to raise awareness, it is a good one.

    Useful English I think too!

    Hope some find this useful...

    Hannah

    PS I will get around to writing them up and putting them in the lesson plan
    bit, but I am too busy preparing and teaching them at the mo! Soon exams will give me free time!

    You too can overcome boring reading from textbook human tape recorder syndrome!
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  9. #9
    Senior Member solacegirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom (England)
    Posts
    552

    Default

    Hannah can you put up the rules for Consequences...could this work for a class of 40 students??
    "I don't want to go to Waitrose, I want a fuck buddy."

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    I will hopefull have time to put stuff on in the teaching bit soon, but just a quick guide to consequences here for now...

    (And yes it is most suitable for 40 students)

    Have the students sit in their regimented lines...

    Give the first student in each line a piece of paper. As them to write a girls name (the name of a girl in the class or famous woman) at the top of the paper.

    They then fold over the paper twice (so the next person won't be able to read it) and pass it to the next student in the line who then writes a boy's name (again the name of boy in the class, a famous man or teacher or someone everyone will know).

    Again, the paper is folded twice and passed back. The next person writes the name of a place

    Next, the situation

    -What she said

    -What he said

    -What happend in the end (The consequence)

    Then the paper is passed back to the first person in the line who reads out the story! Can be very amusing!

    That was enough for 7 in a row... You can adapt it according to how many kids you have in each row.. Either miss out a step such as the situation or add a step such as an animal, or what he did, what she did.

    Hope this explanation is good enough. I enjoyed playing this with ni nenseis but you can differentiate according to year or ability of the class.

    Have fun Solace girl!
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Come on guys, post your good ideas here!

    I'm waiting..... :wink:
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Yo Hanna! This game's called sorting your dangly bits ... uh wait, that one's on Saturday nights.

    I did a pretty easy to prepare one these last couple days on the comparative for 2 nenseis. Just printed a bunch of nouns on paper and put them in a sack. I tried having kids drawing out of the sack and making comparative sentences one-on-one, but most are too shy for that. The best combination I found was to put the kids in groups and draw the nouns myself. Then the groups had to be the fastest to make a comparative sentence from randomly picked things like Tokyo Tower and Udon, or things like that. I had little wooden building blocks and gave five for each right answer as a motivator. Tall stacks falling over is fun!

    Regarding battleships, I now insist on explaining it myself rather than having the teachers do it. I can do it in half the time. Make sure to have the kids draw in whatever targets they use and then get in pairs before explaining how to play. If they're looking at their own sheets and sitting in pairs they'll get it pretty quick.

    A teacher did a great game the other day for the relative pronoun (this is a book THAT has a blue cover) for 3 nenseis. Make a sheet with three columns. First column has nouns like Students, Boys, Girls, People. Second column has verbs such as 'who like', 'who wear', 'who live', 'who go', 'who have'. Third column has various nouns to finish the sentences: Students who live in Nakahaya; Boys who have long hair, etc. He gave the kids five minutes to write sample sentences, then we played fruit basket with the kid in the middle reading the next sentence. Anyone who fit the description had to change seats. I was sceptical but it worked like a charm!

    Elementary stuff: Four corners is a smash with all age levels. Whoever is out has to sit in the middle with "It" and help count to 10. I name the four corners with whatever vocab is difficult from that day.

    Probably my most successful lesson so far in elementary is What do you want to be?, for 5th and 6th graders. First demo the convo between the two teachers. Write your answers on the board in English and then Japanese. Ask the kids if they can figure out what you're talking about. Don't let your JTE tell them! Do pronunciation practice and have everyone be able to say the target language. Then ask for a volunteer. Have them stand up, but then make them wait. Have the whole class ask them together "What do you want to be?" If you're doing the whole answer of "I want to be a ___", make sure they answer with the whole sentence. They can use Japanese at first (ie: I want to be a yakyusha), then translate and put it on the board in Japanese and English. Everyone repeats the new word together a couple times (baseball player, baseball player), then makes the whole sentence (I want to be a baseball player). When everyone has given an answer, whittle the list on the board down to about 18 or so, and play interview bingo on a 4x4 grid. The kids write 16 careers in J or E in the grid in any order, and then get up and ask each other what they want to be. Careful, your teachers will probably try to hijack this and have 2 kids at a time interview each other in front of the class, with the whole class marking off the answers as they go. No! Have everyone talking to each other the whole time! This works great and takes about exactly 45 mins for a class of 16-20. If you have more, ask for volunteers to say what they want to be and cut it off at 18 in order to start bingo on time.

    Lemme know if you have any questions!
    -Todd in Wak

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Hey Todd, Wassup?!

    Quote Originally Posted by tvanhorne
    Yo Hanna! This game's called sorting your dangly bits ... uh wait, that one's on Saturday nights.

    -Todd in Wak
    Hey, don't I know it! I've seen you in a toga! 8O

    Why weren't you at our Valentine's do in Nara this weekend? You missed a treat!

    Anyway, cheers for the ideas... I shall be borrowing them in the near future...

    See you!

    Hannah
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  14. #14
    Senior Member solacegirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom (England)
    Posts
    552

    Default

    Word! THanx Hannah this is gonna be fun...!
    "I don't want to go to Waitrose, I want a fuck buddy."

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Congo
    Posts
    917

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nicklad
    I am at a technical high school so if I suggested some of those games I would get laughed at.
    But this thread is a good idea Hannah.
    Hey nicklad, what kind of things are you doing with your technical high students? I`m running low on the ideas front! Cheers.
    Give me my marker show me my line... surely this is it... the edge?

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Mito-cho
    Posts
    186

    Default

    http://www.efl4u.com/images/Samples/...omanceQuiz.pdf

    My students LOVED this activity. I thought it would be too hard, and a few of the ideas are culturally biased (No one here has heard of a blind date) but...the guys were into it more than the girls! I didn't give any vocabulary help initially, just split them in threes. They had to raise their hand for the JTE and myself to come over and explain things with English and gestures (They will remember "cuddle" for the rest of their lives I think) and...it worked ...My JTE ended up joining a group because she wanted to know here score, and then teachers in the staff room started taking the quiz too...
    try it? My students are high school, but it was first year students (at the end of first year)

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Come on guys, share your new lesson ideas!!

    I have a few up my sleeve.

    Will post them soon!

    Junior High
    Don't be shy, tell us what your doing with your brand new ichi nens and how are you tackling the ni nens now they are no longer the littlest in the school? What about the san nens? Are they too cool for your lessons?!!

    High
    Fresh from JHS. How are you gonna get them speaking English instead of a quiet "hello" or "see yoooo" and then hysteria?

    Elementary
    Any cool new ideas? These are the chaps and chappesses we need to get at! They're not shy and self contious. What games do you play?

    Looking forward to your replies.

    I will post soon....!
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Well, thanks guys for your tremendous response.... keep up the good work!


    Here are my ideas (now tried and tested) for first classes back in JHS...

    Ichi nensei

    Warm up : "Fizz Buzz" game.

    A good way to assess how well they can already count in English. You could start with the whole class repeating numbers after you, to a beat or rhythm on a CD..

    Then count round the class... until they get stuck... help a bit until it becomes too painful!

    Once they have got the hang of numbers, replace a number with "Fizz" say 4. So each time you get to a number 4, say "Fizz" instead! ie 1, 2, 3, fizz, 5, 6 7, 8 ...... 12, 13, Fizz, 15, 16 17 ...... 22, 23, Fizz and so on.

    If they are confident you can replace another number with buzz.

    Main teaching


    Have the children stand up and stretch... it really helps! Do some exercise!

    Introductions

    My name is ________
    Nice to meet you

    demo with shaking hands!!

    Put kids in pairs to practice. You could do an introduction race down the lines.

    Teach then the Sandman game

    Teacher choses a couple of sandmen in secret ("anata ga sandman").
    The students have to go around introducing themselves to eachother and shake hands. The sandman has a secret handshake. He\she tickles your hand with pointer finger while shaking hands! Yes a little creapy!

    If the sandman shakes your hand, you have to count to ten quietly and preferably in English!! and then die - as dramatically as you like! The dead students must sit out.

    the idea of the game is for the sandman to kill as many students as possible and for the students to practice introducing themselves...

    (You need to push all the desks back for this one)

    Students play the sandman game. The success of this game depends on the enthusiasm of your students and English comprehenstion skills of your teacher... it could go either way!!!

    Plenary (conclusion)

    When the game is over, choose random numbers of students to stand up and demonstrate their introduction in pairs...

    have to go to class now...

    to be continued...
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Another ichi nensei game that I didn't have time to try this time was

    "Alphabet Shopping"

    Students take it in turns to say...

    student 1. "I went shopping and I bought an a_______________."

    student 2. "I went shopping and I bought a b________________."

    etc...

    it works best sat in a circle rather than regemented desks, I'd imagine.

    I though that the words could be in English or Japanese as the ichi nenseis won't know many English words yet.

    Useful resouces - an alphabet (much like the one you would have had in your Reception/Year 1/Kindergarten classroon as a kid!!

    Only you could make one with slightyly cooler things on it if you were so inclined!
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Ni nensei

    I have a stupid teacher (actually I have several) so he only let me do half of the lesson, and told me what to base it on so this is what I did....

    I made a worksheet (took me bloody hours) with

    "Were you busy last Sunday?" (I know, not very useful English, huh)

    And at the top "Yes I was. I was ____________________

    then I had pictures for the kids to choose what they were busy doing.

    then

    No, I wasn't. I was _______________________________

    with more pictures of what the kids could have been doing if they were not busy last Sunday.

    So, the kids had to make up two sentences. One which was true (what they were really doing last Sunday) and one which is false (that they weren't doing on Sunday.

    Then, student numbers picked at random, they had to stand up in pairs while I asked them "Were you busy last Sunday?" to which one of the students had to say their two sentences ... while the other had to guess which one was true...

    If they guess right, they can have a sticker... if they guess wrong, the trickster student (the one saying his/her sentences) get the sticker....

    They really liked it once they understood what it was about... Sometimes I wonder what the teacher is saying to the class when he speaks for about 15 minutes apparently explaing a game, and then the students still don't know what is going on!! I find I can explain in a foreign language and have better results!

    Anyway, it took about 20 minutes of the lesson.
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •