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  1. #1
    Senior Member kalliea's Avatar
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    Default US Job Market

    Given the current US job market, would you take any job offered, or wait and hope for the perfect job?
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    VIP UPGRAYEDD's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    There is a middle ground here.
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    OPPORTUNITYISNOWHERE mteacher80's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    if you wait for a perfect job it may never come and you will be come homeless and full o debt.......i would put some sort of biddle ground though likeupgrayedd said. you may have to go a bit below what you hoped for...as in in salary and and stuff. but dont just jump into a mcdonalds job or something.
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    You take that job, and run like hell with it. Don't look back.
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    Billy Big Bollocks Ini's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    asking kal to run?

    stop trolling
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    Senior Member kalliea's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    I ran 4.8 miles just this morning.

    But about the job...I'm not comparing a dream job to a fastfood one. I mean...would you move if the job you wanted wasn't in your area? Would you take one in the field for less benefits, or a similar job that wasn't exactly what you wanted to do?
    Last edited by kalliea; April 28th, 2012 at 04:18.
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    Senior Member Tyr's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    Clearly take any job. Work isn't meant to be good, its just a way of getting money so you don't starve and can buy shiny things.
    There's nothing stopping you then looking for that rarity, a job which is decent, once you've got your survival sorted. Gaps in the CV certainly aren't good when job hunting too.

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    Resident ewok wicket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyr View Post
    Clearly take any job. Work isn't meant to be good, its just a way of getting money so you don't starve and can buy shiny things..
    I hate this attitude [sorry Tyr, I like you].
    The fact that so many people hate their jobs is why there's bad customer service, bad teaching, mistakes in medical practices, food poisoning from restaurants etc. etc.
    I have NEVER taken a job I couldn't find some kind of enjoyment in - and I've done quite a variety - from floor-sweeping to bell-hopping to translation to teaching to house-cleaning to tutoring to sub-editing to check-out-chicking to cooking to bar work to babysitting.
    One of the things I liked about Japan was that even in many of the menial jobs, people were encouraged to take pride in their work; and they were acknowledged for the importance of the job they were doing. That's why the garbage is picked up on time and properly; and why tables and toilets are clean in restaurants.
    I would argue it is possible to like any kind of job you are capable of doing. And I would move anywhere for the perfect job.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wicket View Post
    I hate this attitude [sorry Tyr, I like you].
    The fact that so many people hate their jobs is why there's bad customer service, bad teaching, mistakes in medical practices, food poisoning from restaurants etc. etc.
    I have NEVER taken a job I couldn't find some kind of enjoyment in - and I've done quite a variety - from floor-sweeping to bell-hopping to translation to teaching to house-cleaning to tutoring to sub-editing to check-out-chicking to cooking to bar work to babysitting.
    One of the things I liked about Japan was that even in many of the menial jobs, people were encouraged to take pride in their work; and they were acknowledged for the importance of the job they were doing. That's why the garbage is picked up on time and properly; and why tables and toilets are clean in restaurants.
    I would argue it is possible to like any kind of job you are capable of doing. And I would move anywhere for the perfect job.
    If someone is willing to move for a job, and willing to apply over and over again and get rejected that are very likely to land the job they want in end.

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    Senior Member kalliea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwkelley View Post
    If someone is willing to move for a job, and willing to apply over and over again and get rejected that are very likely to land the job they want in end.
    "In the end" is the problem. I've been jobless for 2 months now. I could take an assistant job in my area that pays half what I'm looking to make, but I could get my PhD for free while I work and be near family, plus save on moving costs. I could take a job on the other side of the country that is sort of a middle ground - not where I want it, not the job I thought I wanted to do, but it pays okay and has benefits. Or I could wait and hope that the perfect job comes up, AND that I would be the most qualified to apply for it. But waiting that long is likely to drive me insane.

    At this point I think I'm just going to take the first job I'm offered. I just hope someone actually offers me one...
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    ฿300,000,000 greengoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wicket View Post
    I hate this attitude [sorry Tyr, I like you].
    The fact that so many people hate their jobs is why there's bad customer service, bad teaching, mistakes in medical practices, food poisoning from restaurants etc. etc.
    I have NEVER taken a job I couldn't find some kind of enjoyment in - and I've done quite a variety - from floor-sweeping to bell-hopping to translation to teaching to house-cleaning to tutoring to sub-editing to check-out-chicking to cooking to bar work to babysitting.
    One of the things I liked about Japan was that even in many of the menial jobs, people were encouraged to take pride in their work; and they were acknowledged for the importance of the job they were doing. That's why the garbage is picked up on time and properly; and why tables and toilets are clean in restaurants.
    I would argue it is possible to like any kind of job you are capable of doing. And I would move anywhere for the perfect job.
    I agree with everything here.
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    Senior Member Tyr's Avatar
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    If it is apples and oranges, and you are offered apples... I would take the first job until the dream job was obtained.

    The current market is rough, so... the best advice is concise if you don't even have an apple:

    1) Take a night gig at a restaurant, bar, or even a paper route if you don't want to live down your savings. OR Live off your savings.
    I dunno about America at the minute but before I came to Japan for me in the UK even this was a lot easier said than done. I just couldn't get any sort of work. There weren't that many minimum wage jobs going and those that were available quite logically went to those people who had a history of such jobs and no education and so would likely be sticking around for a while; not the graduate just looking for a way to get train money so he could afford to go to interviews for jobs he actually wanted.


    Quote Originally Posted by wicket View Post
    I hate this attitude [sorry Tyr, I like you].
    The fact that so many people hate their jobs is why there's bad customer service, bad teaching, mistakes in medical practices, food poisoning from restaurants etc. etc.
    I have NEVER taken a job I couldn't find some kind of enjoyment in - and I've done quite a variety - from floor-sweeping to bell-hopping to translation to teaching to house-cleaning to tutoring to sub-editing to check-out-chicking to cooking to bar work to babysitting.
    One of the things I liked about Japan was that even in many of the menial jobs, people were encouraged to take pride in their work; and they were acknowledged for the importance of the job they were doing. That's why the garbage is picked up on time and properly; and why tables and toilets are clean in restaurants.
    I would argue it is possible to like any kind of job you are capable of doing. And I would move anywhere for the perfect job.
    I'm not so sure there. I think that many Japanese actually do recognise that they have shit jobs. They've just got the whole honne/tatemae thing going on which makes it a lot less common over here for you to get rude waiters and the like.
    Certainly even if you're working a terrible job I agree that you should try not to let it show and to try and do the best you can at it for the customers.
    Also confusing things in Japan is how 'modern' a country it is, in the not entirely positive definition of the word. It wasn't all that long ago that it was pretty darn poor and knew starvation. As a result amongst the older generation you do seem to get a lot more job pride. With the kids though...I don't think you see the same sort of thing, they have/had higher hopes in life just like western folks, they're just good at hiding the fact that work is just the place they go to get money.
    Hell, even away from Japan, even in Britain I find my parents generation are a lot more content with naff jobs than mine, they were brought up being told that was the best they could expect whilst we were promised the world.

    A big problem with kids these days (grumble grumble, gerrof my lawn, etc...) is that there is too much expectation that work must be a wonderful thing. That they can get their dream job and do whatever they want.
    Certainly we've a lot more choice than our ancestors ever did, but still, work isn't meant to be fun, its meant to be work. If you can make it fun, if you do find a job you like, then that is absolutely wonderful. But this is just an added extra tacked onto the real purpose of work, something you can think about achieving once you've got your survival assured. We shouldn't turn our nose up at less than ideal work, at least as a stop gap.
    Last edited by Tyr; May 17th, 2012 at 10:23.

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    chill yo coop52's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyr View Post
    A big problem with kids these days (grumble grumble, gerrof my lawn, etc...) is that there is too much expectation that work must be a wonderful thing. That they can get their dream job and do whatever they want.
    Certainly we've a lot more choice than our ancestors ever did, but still, work isn't meant to be fun, its meant to be work. If you can make it fun, if you do find a job you like, then that is absolutely wonderful. But this is just an added extra tacked onto the real purpose of work, something you can think about achieving once you've got your survival assured. We shouldn't turn our nose up at less than ideal work, at least as a stop gap.
    There's some mixed messages being told to kids. Kids are told "go to college or you'll spend the rest of your life flipping burgers at McDonald's" from the moment they start school. Once they get out, people are telling them "take any job you can get, and be grateful for it" and wondering why new graduates aren't so keen on flipping burgers at McDonald's. It doesn't help that jobs involving manual labor or technical skills (mechanics, electricians, etc) tend to be looked down on as something lower class people do, despite the fact that people can earn a comfortable living doing them.

  14. #14

    Default Re: US Job Market

    If it is apples and oranges, and you are offered apples... I would take the first job until the dream job was obtained.

    The current market is rough, so... the best advice is concise if you don't even have an apple:

    1) Take a night gig at a restaurant, bar, or even a paper route if you don't want to live down your savings. OR Live off your savings.

    2) Apply for jobs full-time, and volunteer in the meantime:

    3) Volunteer: Apply for Volunteer positions and internships at offices/companies that you want to work at or need skills in as soon as you are jobless. Or create an internship for yourself: Offer to work full time without pay for one month, part time after if needed. If you do well, they might hire you on! Or at least give you a buffer boost into another job in the field + good reference. I did this and am now working for the company.

    Sadly, it is easier to get a "good" job in the US if you already have a good job. We are a land of tautologies. Good luck job-hunting. It is brutal. And yah... I would move for a good stepping-stone job. I've worked for free before... so getting paid to get some good XP would be worth a move and some toil.
    Last edited by orchidee; May 13th, 2012 at 18:58.

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    Senior Member Eudox's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    Of course, you spend a huge whack of your time working (if you're full-time), so it would be stupid to not try and get a job you enjoy. I'm pretty sure Tyr was just meaning any job is better than being unemployed/starving.

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    Gizmoduck - blatherskite Gizmotech's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    Comfortable living? HAHAHA. You mean rolling in it?

    I had a friend who was a plumber + general contractor. His rough estimate (cuz he stopped caring) was about 80k/year working about 9 months of the year.
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  17. #17
    Senior Member Tyr's Avatar
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    There's some mixed messages being told to kids. Kids are told "go to college or you'll spend the rest of your life flipping burgers at McDonald's" from the moment they start school. Once they get out, people are telling them "take any job you can get, and be grateful for it" and wondering why new graduates aren't so keen on flipping burgers at McDonald's. It doesn't help that jobs involving manual labor or technical skills (mechanics, electricians, etc) tend to be looked down on as something lower class people do, despite the fact that people can earn a comfortable living doing them.
    100% agree.
    Modern society puts university on way too much of a pedestal. It is set out to kids like it is the only path in life that is worth anything. Its university or nothing.
    The trouble is...because it is on such a pedestal a degree is often stated as a minimum for even many terrible jobs, so often there is no choice but to go to university even though it won't bring you anything near the benefits it would have done in your parents time.

    If you look to some countries in Europe you see they've got things far more right.
    They maintain a distinction between academic universities and technical schools training for jobs. Though one is "higher" than the other both are still seen as perefectly valid options for anyone to take.
    Germany also has a rather wonderful on the job training and apprenticship system.

    A big problem I had with my bachellor was that I learned very little there. When it came to learning a programming language the teacher basically just said "This is the book I advise you read, next month I expect a finished program which does x and y." Just...wtf? I could do that on my own. How is this a class? And so much of the stuff we were taught,...just useless.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotech View Post
    Comfortable living? HAHAHA. You mean rolling in it?

    I had a friend who was a plumber + general contractor. His rough estimate (cuz he stopped caring) was about 80k/year working about 9 months of the year.
    Indeed.
    That isn't even a post-2008 thing. I remember 10 years ago it was quite a big story in the UK about how people were quitting jobs as university professors to become plumbers and the like.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Eudox's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    Word. It's just the people who don't (okay, depending on where you are it *could* be can't, but you can always move), make the best of their opportunities that end up making a comfortable living. Fast food may be one of the only jobs where you can't really do that well, even if you want to.

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    OPPORTUNITYISNOWHERE mteacher80's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    jobless for ONLY 2 months is not that bad though. in sticking with returning JETs as thats what most of us are/will be on here...i know people that came home the same time as me (2 years ago) and still dont have jobs. Even more that came back last year. If you get any offer for something even decent take it and consider yourself lucky. You can always continue to look for the BEST job, keep your resume up to date and do underestimate the power of LinkedIn!
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  20. #20
    Senior Member kalliea's Avatar
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    Default Re: US Job Market

    I was at a meeting at my old university last month and heard that people looking for work in academia should expect a 6-12 month turn around time. I know 2 months isn't bad, but it is the longest I've been unemployed since I was 15. The idea of being in this state of limbo for 6-12 months make me ill. Plus, I live in a college town. There are no jobs here, other than through the university which is in a hiring freeze. I would flip burgers while looking for a real job, but there is simply nothing here.

    This means I will take the first job offered, and my desperation makes me even more anxious because, what if the first job offered to me is crap? What if they offer it at the lowest end of the salary range? What if the university that offers doesn't have a graduate program for me? What if I have to uproot my entire life and move to the middle of nothing more concrete than a promise and the position is cancelled at the last minute? What if, what if, what if.

    That is why it is driving me nuts. The current job market makes taking a job anywhere a greater gamble, with less reward and less recourse if it goes wrong.
    Last edited by kalliea; May 20th, 2012 at 17:17.
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