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Thread: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

  1. #41

    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

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  2. #42
    Feckless Manchild Otaku word's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

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  3. #43
    Gizmoduck - blatherskite Gizmotech's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

    Discrimination has been addressed. Like ini said get short listed. Then they will take that into consideration for your placement so that you might not be stuck too far out in the inaka (just in case) and closer to a hospital that can help.
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  4. #44
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    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotech View Post
    Discrimination has been addressed. Like ini said get short listed. Then they will take that into consideration for your placement so that you might not be stuck too far out in the inaka (just in case) and closer to a hospital that can help.
    It's been addressed but the answers never satisfied me in regards to two issues.
    First, if it comes down to two people with almost equal qualifications and a similar score on paper, but one has a history of depression and the other doesn't... You can't tell me it won't affect the chances of the former.
    The second is subconscious discrimination. So they tell the people scoring the application to disregard the medical assessment, but telling someone to disregard something, or not take something into account doesn't actually mean the person is able to do that. It is similar to how jurors are asked to disregard a statement made in a trial but it can still affect the outcome.

  5. #45

    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

    I completely agree with you. There will always be at the very least, a subconscious level of discrimination against applicants with mental health issues, or even medical conditions. It's human nature do so, especially when reviewers are trying to assess a potential applicant's ability to cope in Japan for 1 year.
    Having said that, the best thing anybody in that situation can do is make the rest of their application as strong as possible. Then, any detriments can be somewhat overlooked.

  6. #46
    Gizmoduck - blatherskite Gizmotech's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

    AVN, at that point there is nothing wrong w/ that decision. Anyone is allowed to make that call assuming two equally qualified people, and given the position in question, I would absolutely chose the potentially more stable candidate over the other if all other options were equal. As for scoring, I've heard it's check boxes. Pretty hard to input any feelings into the check boxes that get most of the score sorted before the interview.

    Like Ini said, don't get alternated. Mental health and physical illness is protected in the states, they can't disqualify you at that stage. Once it goes to the COs though, they can discriminate ALL THEY WANT. It's really easy. A short lister will 99% get placed. An Alternate with a potential problem will likely not be, given there are other alternates, and the CO can just keep asking for a new resume if they don't like the last one. And there's the rub, just like I said above, all things being equal (alternate list status), the candidate with less maintenance issues will win and matches their arbitrary criteria (Male, 22, blue eyes, desperate// or Landwhale).

    Either way, As we have no way of knowing how that will affect things before placement, and have no control of things after placement, it doesn't really matter.

    The facts are:
    If you don't disclose it, and they find out, you will be disqualified (Lying) or potentially fired (relapse at work).
    If you do disclose it, and don't ace everything, there is a chance it could negatively affect you as COs can absolutely discriminate against alternates
    If you do disclose a medical condition with specific requirements, and you get shortlisted, CLAIR will do their best to ensure you are in a place where you can receive treatment. (IE not stuck in the 3 hour to somewhere BFI)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Antonath View Post
    We Jeeperneez are express all emotion through money. Wedding is happy money. Funeral is sad money. Izakaya is friendship money. Girl-bar is almost-sex money. But babby-borning is bery happy money, as no babby in Japan. All babby is special so we is givings much money as presento for babby.

  7. #47
    Senior Member tedcase's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

    Simple,

    Ask yourself WHY they need to know these things.
    JET can be stressful, especially if you are deep in the paddies with no-one to talk to for weeks at a time. They need to know that you are not going to get depressed, which is completely understandable.

    If you have a history of mental illness, the chances of JET knocking you down is high. If the people at JET think your past mental condition is serious, the WILL take it into consideration. So if you put it on your app, you need to be clear that it is a problem that is resolved, and there is no chance of it happening again. This is your honest opinion, which can be backed up by a medical proffessional. Jet will take this into consideration, but to be honest, it is still a negative point. Don't worry, everyone will have negative points in their app, it's just up to you to compensate elsewhere.

    The alternative is to not mention it at all. This is a risk on two counts. You will risk putting yourself into a seriously stressful situatiuon and risk damaging your long term mental health. Is a 1-3 year work programme really worth risking your health over?
    The other risk with this plan is of course, JET finding out. I honestly couldn't tell you how much they check into these things, but my instincs tell me that they dont. The reason I say this is because I know of at least one JET who got on without finishing his degree. JET never found out.

    Just think of the consequences of either course of action. Nobody can tell you what to do. It's up to you. Just seriously consider whether or not your mental health issues are truly resolved.

    For what it's worth, If you are american, Which im guessing you are, they have a bad habit of medicating and diagnosing kids with all sorts of mental health crap when really there is nothing at all wrong. I dont doubt that if the average, unmedicated brit or Australian went to an american doctor, they would leave with a big bag of pills and a hefty bill.

    TLDR,
    Don't feel too bad about conflicting advice on here. Everyone has their own opinions, but take all the information on board and use it to make a descision. Nobody knows you as well as you do, so it's up to you to make the choice you think is right.
    Last edited by tedcase; November 8th, 2013 at 02:09.
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  8. #48
    Comrade therealwindycity's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

    Spot on, tedcase. I get the feeling that this was another case in which something was diagnosed that didn't really need to be. Personally, I wouldn't mention it considering how common it is in the US and that you haven't required any ongoing medication or counseling.

  9. #49
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    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

    Quote Originally Posted by b23784 View Post
    Everybody is mentioning that if JET were to find out that you lied about your medical history, they will kick you out. But has this actually happened to anyone? I was searching around because I'm in a similar situation (took some medications a few years ago, but not anymore) and was wondering if I should just lie on my application. I found a lot of people saying "theoretically, if they found out..." but nobody actually talked about getting caught while doing this. I can't really think of any way they could find out about this.
    Applying for the US military requires a lot of the same things JET does, and in both cases what I've seen is that you could be a bona-fide schizophrenic and nobody would be the wiser-- there's no way to "test" for mental illness, and screening for these things is not part of either application process. The trick is this though-- the ways this sort of thing ever comes to light is if they (successfully) trigger a breakdown during boot camp, coerce you into confessing during the last-chance "moment of truth," if you have a breakdown in the field, or as a result of security clearance investigation. Then you get canned, and there are severe consequences. So if the long arm of the US military can't reliably discover things like these without forcing your hand, nobody at JET administration is going to have an easier time of it unless you freak out in the classroom or some kid finds your stray bottle of Seroquel.

    tl;dr If you can keep your shit together then don't mention it in the application.
    Last edited by octagon; November 28th, 2013 at 10:07.

  10. #50

    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

    Hey! this is a bit late as the applications have closed! but I just stumbled cross these forums and thought it might be worth chiming in as when I was readying my application I couldn't find n awful lot of guidance in this department (I don't know how I missed this treasure!).

    I was initially quite concerned about disclosing my previous mental history in my application, as I was sure that it would seriously hamper my chances. I was totally honest, and supplied a (pretty cringe-y and brutally honest) cover letter with my application. And lo and behold- I am scheduled for an interview next week. No doubt it'll be a discussion topic in the interview, but it is possible to get at least this far with a history of mental illness. So, I hope this is helpful to someone in the future.

  11. #51
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    Default Re: How to address (or not address) past mental health issues

    I mentioned the meds I take in 2008 and got an interview but didn't get any further. I mentioned it this time around and didn't get anything. I've been living in Korea for 3 years and my doctor wrote in my Physicians Form that I'm very stable and able to live overseas without any issues. Like the above poster said, if you take meds for mental health issues there has to be some level of discrimination involved whether they like to admit it or not. I decided it's better to disclose it and risk not getting accepted for two reasons 1)if accepted they might take your situation into consideration and put you somewhere where you have access to meds 2)if you get caught lying you are fired.

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