Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 68

Thread: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

  1. #1
    Feckless Manchild Otaku word's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    日本
    Posts
    18,421

    Default Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    In the past, I would pick applicants that I liked on the forums and send them overly-verbose chunks of interview advice. Since traffic on the forum has drastically decreased in the age of Facebook and the like, and since so few applicants are posting in The Lounge, and since I may only be in Japan for another year or two, anyway, I decided I might as well just post the whole thing here for the public. This is a copy of the PM I usually sent out to two or three people every year. If nothing else, maybe it will get a few more people to visit.

    Most of this advice is pretty standard, common-sense stuff that could be applied to any job interview. Some of you won't really give a f*ck or will disagree completely with some aspect of it, and that's fine. If you can get something out of it, cool.

    TL;DR: Smile

    Scheduling:

    You might have some control over when your interview takes place. For our group, they opened up the interview times on an online scheduler. This is probably more important than most people think. The day and time of your interview can influence your chances--at least, I think so.

    You don't want to be first. You don't want to be last. You don't want to be the first interviewee of the day. You definitely don't want to be the last interviewee of the day. You don't want to be the last interviewee before lunch, either.

    When I interviewed, the interviews were held on a Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.

    I set my interview up for 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, I believe. I had looked online to try to figure out the best time to interview. Most articles indicated that mid-morning was best--everyone is awake, not groggy like they are at 8 a.m., but it's not so close to lunchtime that everyone's hungry and distracted.

    My advice--watch for the exact moment that the online scheduler for interviews is opened. I was waiting at my computer, refreshing the page every five seconds, at 5:00 p.m. the Friday that they opened it. I got the time that I wanted. Maybe it helped. I have no idea. Can't hurt, though. The time slots will fill quickly! Try to get a good one!

    If you can't do this and you end up with a slot you didn't want, don't stress. This is probably a pretty small thing in the big picture...

    Note: I think the consulates may have caught on to the idea that people are aware of the potential scheduling benefit and have started assigning times, rather than allowing you to select them. My information here may be dated.

    Fashion, Health, and Well-Being Advice:

    Coming from me, this is kinda LOL, but I've learned from my lack of ability--I have a terrible fashion sense when it comes to myself, unfortunately, but I'm aware of this fact and take appropriate measures to deal with this handicap.

    For boys and girls: Get a good suit, if you don't have one. Get it fitted by someone who knows what he or she is doing. It should be a successful tailor who has been in the business for some time. I got mine done by an old man in [a nearby city] who had been a local tailor his whole life. My suit fit like a glove. I looked better than I ever had before. I'm not much of a suit guy, but it looked damned smart on me.

    For boys: Get a good tie. Everyone at the interview, and I mean EVERYONE, will have a blue or red (or blue and red) striped tie. Everyone will also have a white shirt, now that I think about it, actually. My advice on this point is to STAND OUT. Not like, you know, crazily, but be distinct. Leave an impression. Case in point--the ex-JET on the interview panel was wearing a completely different tie--a flashy, yet somewhat conservative GREEN striped tie. I wore a yellow tie with a graphic design. It was very professional-looking, but also interesting--much more so than any other candidate. Don't wear an anime tie or anything like that. You might go with a color other than white for the shirt, too. Look coordinated, though. Get opinions from several people before you decide on a final outfit. Bring a backup suit, if you can. Backup tie, backup shoes, etc. Just in case.

    I have no sense of fashion. Actually, I have just outright terrible sense in fashion. It's weird for me to even be discussing it, much less dispensing advice to someone else. These are the things I learned through the process, though, so, yanno, take them as you will. The whole thing was a huge learning process for me.

    For boys and girls: Take care of yourself before the interview. Eat healthily, get on a regular schedule of sleeping, don't smoke a bunch of *ahem* or drink a bunch of booze in the weeks approaching the interview, and get on a regular schedule of shitting. (Sounds stupid, I know, but the goddamned last thing you want to have happen in the interview is to need to take a shit. You'll already be nervous enough. Avoid nature's call. You might want to dose up on Pepto-Bismol the night before.) You want to look GOOD in the interview. Get a haircut/do at a GOOD stylist a week or two before the interview (or two days before, like I did). Take care of yourself! If you feel good, you'll look good!

    Boys and girls: If it is at all possible, go to [your interview city] the day before. Get a hotel room. It sucks--this was a lot of money for me--but it's worth it. You'll look fantastic compared to any of the other candidates who drove or flew in that morning. There was a hotel in which I roomed right next to the interview location. It was pricey, but worth twice the cost--I walked to my interview from my hotel room in under five minutes. Be sure to get a non-smoking room (Do you smoke? Try not to smell like smoke in the interview). The day before, go to the interview location--I mean, don't go to the actual room where the interviews are happening, but check the building. Make sure you know how to get there easily. Seriously, you'll be glad you did...

    Boys and girls: The day before, don't eat anything weird. Stay away from anything that could possibly make you sick or something. Don't drink alcohol. Don't drink tea right before you go to bed. Drink milk or water before you go to bed. Try to sleep (but don't take sleep aids or anything like that). It was difficult for me, but I did fall asleep eventually (after laying awake for some time trying). You want to be refreshed in the morning.

    Have three alarms and a wake-up call. Set your phone alarm, the hotel alarm, and your back-up alarm. You don't want to be late for this. Get up early enough that you won't be stressed at all (but not so early that you're a zombie all day). (Boys: Shave as early as possible, right after you get out of the shower. Use a good multi-blade razor (Gillette Fusion) and a good shaving cream.) Make sure your nose-hairs are under control and you don't have any boogers that are gonna mess with your style. Don't wear heavy cologne or body spray or perfume anything. Easy on scented deodorant. You don't want to stink or be sweaty, but two of the interviewers will be Japanese (although they have probably lived in America for some time), and Japanese people aren't all about strong perfumes (most people here don't even wear deodorant... I'm fairly certain I'm the only person at my school who does). If you do go for something, go easy on it!

    Boys and girls: Don't don't don't DON'T eat anything while wearing your suit. Eat in your underwear or something. If you eat, anyway. I think I scarfed down a granola bar. You want to have enough in you that you're not falling asleep or making weird stomach noises, but not something that's going to be heavy, cause you don't want something that's gonna cause weird stomach noises, or make you sleepy.

    Boys and girls: Don't drink a lot of water or anything before the interview. I suspect they'll have a cooler in the waiting room. You might bring a bottle of water, just in case. Don't want to have dry-mouth. You don't want to have to piss, either, though. Piss before you leave the hotel room.

    Boys and girls: Right before you leave the hotel room, give yourself a pep talk. Look at yourself in the mirror. You look good (I don't actually know what you look like, but, yanno, you know you do). You've made it this far. You're successful and capable of doing this. You're going to bitch-slap this interview. It's going to be a walk in the park.

    When you walk to the interview building, enjoy it. It'll probably be a nice day. Revel in it. Smile at the people you walk by; make eye contact with them; hold your head high. You want to be in a confident, cheerful mood when you walk into that interview room. Get yourself into character as early as possible! From the second those interviewers see you, you should be radiating confidence, competence, and cheer!

    The Actual Interview:

    You'll notice that I have not actually said a word about interview questions or the interview itself. There's a reason for it--the interview and the questions don't really matter--not really. The interview is about you--who are you, why are you here, what are you offering the program, how will you take the stress of life in Japan? The idea of all the previous advice is to show you at your absolute best! You want to go in there and be the best goddamned YOU you can possibly be. Trying to memorize a zillion obscure facts about Japanese politics, history, and culture is pointless if you look like shit and feel shittier. Knowing every single question that's ever been asked in a JET interview is not going to help you if you're groggy and irritated from lack of sleep, or if you're breathless and exhausted from running around trying to find the interview building without being late, or if you're furious because you cut yourself shaving, spilled cereal on your suit, and got stuck in traffic. Be on the ball. Be at your best. Be prepared, collected, and COOL. If you're on top of things, it won't matter what questions they ask you--you'll roll with any punch they swing your way.

    If you really want to prepare, read your SoP the night before. Read it again. Read it a third time. They will probably ask you about something on it.

    In my SoP, I mentioned that my interest in Japan came from the stories that my grandfather told me as a child from the time he was stationed in Tokyo after the war. They asked me to recount one of these stories. My mind went completely blank. COMPLETELY. I could not remember a goddamned thing. I should have been prepared for this. I ended up making up something on the spot. I don't know if they picked up on this or not. Be ready. Your SoP is their primary hunting ground.

    However, even if they had picked up on the fact that I was making up the story as I went along, I don't know that it hurt me. You see, this is another vital component of the interview--ability to respond under pressure. They will put you on the spot, stress you, test you, and see if you can still smile for the camera. Here's a hint--keep talking, keep smiling. If you have no clue what to say, the worst thing you could possibly do is sit there with a scared look on your face.

    Make no mistake--I was f*cking terrified. But I kept talking, kept smiling, and kept responding to them. Even if I didn't know what to say, I would try to respond to their questions as soon as I could think clearly enough to get a rational sentence out. You don't necessarily want to babble like a moron (although, when I left my interview, I thought I had), but it's definitely better than sitting there without saying anything.

    The interview begins the moment you walk into the pre-waiting room. You want to smile, exude confidence, coolness, and friendliness. Smile at the secretary. Laugh at yourself, if the opportunity presents itself.

    Oh, sh*t, let me mention something here--this is vitally important. For the interview, you will have to bring an interview voucher. It is a stupid card, on which you will have to attach a passport photo (you must write your name on the back of the photo, too). It's just a formality, BUT YOU HAVE TO BRING IT. A couple of people forgot theirs at my interview. Guess which folks I didn't see in Tokyo later that summer? Think of it as another tiny "can this candidate follow directions" test. They'll send an email in which they explain the voucher card. I had an extra with me at the hotel, just in case!

    So, back on the interview--it begins before the interview. Smile. Talk to the other candidates. Introduce yourself. Ask if any of them are on ITIL or the official JET bulletin boards. Tell a funny story. Talk about your college career. So on. If any of the interviewers are in the room (a real possibility), they will see you smiling, socializing, and engaging the other candidates. This may go a long way. Several of the folks that interviewed with me were pretty damned cold. I didn't see them in Tokyo.

    Eventually you will be moved into the actual waiting room. There will be a couple of candidates in here, and there WILL be an ex-JET in here. S/he (probably) won't be on your interview panel, but S/he does speak with them. Same thing here. Smile. Radiate confidence and competence. Be at your best. Socialize a little--not just with him/her, but with the other candidates, as well.

    A note here--don't bring anyone to the interview. This should be common sense, but... people try it. Don't bring your mom. Don't bring your boyfriend/girlfriend. If they come with you to [your interview city], that's fine. If they stay in the hotel with you, that's fine. If they see you off from the hotel, that's fine. But leave them in the hotel. A dude brought his girlfriend. She looked like sh*t, too (torn up jeans, ratty t-shirt). DUM.

    And here's a thing about socialization questions--don't be annoying. That dude's girlfriend started asking the ex-JET questions, and she would not f*cking shut up. Her questions were ridiculously stupid. If you want to ask the ex-JET something, ask him useful things that will make him think--"If you could offer me any advice at this point, what would it be?" "If you could do it all over again, what would you do differently?" "Is there something in particular that you wish someone had told you before you went to Japan?" "What should I really try to appreciate while I'm still in America for a couple of months; what will I miss most?" You know, stuff like that. Asking what the trains are like in Japan, or what kind of food you can get there is just f*cking retarded (both questions that she asked). Definitely do not ask how many people will be accepted or what the odds are or anything like that.

    Do not bring a plush anime toy (yes, a guy did this).

    Do not try to impress the ex-JET with your Japanese (yes, a guy did this).

    Do not be haughty or snobby. You want to be a mix of confidence and humility--the sort of person who knows he/she can do something, but if he/she fails, will have no problem laughing it off.

    When you go into the interview room, smile. Introduce yourself. Shake hands, perhaps. The ex-JET on the panel (if you have one) may be the only person who gives you a firm handshake. The other two may give you very typically-Japanese limp fish handshakes (especially if they are women). Be ready for this and take it in stride. Smile. In Japanese culture, making and holding eye contact is considered confrontational and rude. In American culture, it's essential. I would recommend a mix here. Don't hold eye contact with the Japanese interviewers for too long, and when you break it, do so with a downward glance. Actually, scratch that. Try not to think about this too much. It'll just clutter up your brain. Just do what you do naturally. I'll bet you'll be just fine. Remember to smile, though.

    It's okay if you tell them you're a little nervous, but add something positive ("...but I'm very excited to be here!"). Smile. Don't fidget. Fidgeting is very bad manners in Japan. Thank the interviewers for the opportunity.

    Remember, the interviewers are nervous, too. They don't know you. This isn't their normal job. This is an unusual circumstance for them. Make them at ease. The easiest way to do this? You got it: smile.

    Don't try to crack a pre-prepared joke. Don't force a laugh when a grin or a chuckle will do.

    When they ask you a question, it's okay to think for a second, but try to jazz up the "processing" moment with a thoughtful look and a "Well, let's see..." or something. You don't want to sit there in silence. Smile when you answer.

    The questions... I won't go into detail. Everyone's interview is different. You can, of course, see the whole list of questions in the Applying Archives. They vary wildly. Lots of mine were teaching-centered.

    Do be ready for the "Big Three" questions, though. Why JET? Why Japan? Umm... I forgot the third one (must be the Texan in me; to think I have something in common with that idiot governor of ours...).

    But be ready for them to f*ck with you. The ex-JET on my panel did. Early on they asked me "Why Japan?" I'd answered the question very clearly in my SoP. I answered it again when they asked. Towards the end of the interview, he said, "I'm still not sure that I'm really understanding your answers to 'Why Japan?' Can you elaborate more on that?" I was about stumped, I mean, I'd said it pretty clearly twice. But I smiled and reached for an answer, reiterated the bit about my grandfather and my childhood experiences, and ended with something horrible "...but I guess, other than that, I really don't have a clear answer for you." I don't recommend saying that. I don't think that was the important bit, though. I think it had a lot more to do with taking the question in stride. Smile. It helps!

    At the end of the interview, you may have an opportunity to ask questions. I didn't. I had one ready, though. You should, too. Again, along the same lines as the ones you would ask the ex-JET in the waiting room. Not "how did I do" or "will I get in" or "what are the odds" or anything even remotely similar. I was going to say (if given the chance), "I really appreciate the opportunity you are offering me and the time you've permitted me. I know the process is very competitive and that your job is very difficult. If I don't make it this year, is there anything you could recommend in order to improve my chances for acceptance next year?" I think the question may have shown dedication and commitment and may have gone a long way. Or not, maybe it was awful and they would've thought I was a dumbarse. In any case, I never got to ask it. Maybe it was for the best that I didn't have the chance. Who knows! Smile!

    Either way, at the end of the interview, thank them (sincerely), and maybe shake their hand again. I did. I felt like it was awkward. I think, though that it still may have been the right thing to do. Keep smiling. My interview felt like it was over in a flash. I don't actually know how long it lasted. I wasn't asked to do a demo lesson. I wasn't asked to speak any Japanese (I'd indicated the lowest level of proficiency on the app--elementary, I think). Keep smiling!

    I left the interview, and my mouth was instantly parched. I popped into the waiting room to grab a drink. One or two of the waiting applicants asked me about my interview; I said they were nice and didn't ask me anything in Japanese. I think this made the ex-JET nervous, and he kinda shooed me out of the waiting room. So maybe going straight back to the waiting room wasn't a good idea, maybe I was just supposed to leave. As I walked away, I felt weird. It took effort to keep smiling at this point, but I smiled at the receptionist and wished the other waiting candidates luck. I was almost shaking (I'd been able to keep cool in the interview, now it was all coming out). I left the building (it was on the 16th floor) in a daze. I stayed in a daze as I went back to the hotel, checked out, and drove home.

    I couldn't think about how I did. The whole thing felt blurry in my mind. I started remembering all the things I'd done wrong... the stupid answers, the moments of hesitation, that horrible story incident. I was sure my interview was terrible. I tried to downplay the whole thing. Every time someone would mention it I would brush the whole thing off and be all like, "Ah, it's a long shot, I probably won't make it in, I just tried for the f*ck of it." I'd try to stay upbeat and not think about it too much. The next few months were agonizing, and every time I thought about my interview, it seemed worse than before.

    But here I am. So the moral of that bit, I guess, is to try not to stress too much after the interview. You'll invariably think that you did much worse than you actually did... and this is probably a good thing. People who think their interviews were kickass are sometimes very disappointed.

    And I guess that's about it. The important things, I guess, are the parts about taking care of yourself and looking good. Every year, people focus like crazy on the questions (I've been watching this process for over eight years, even though I didn't apply until four years ago), but I don't think this is a good idea. Sure, look over some of the old questions, if you'd like. It can't hurt. But don't let that be the focus of your efforts! The interview isn't about the questions, like I said. It's about you. Be your best. Be goddamned super-you when you walk through that door. Be on your game. If you're looking good, feeling good, they can pitch whatever they want at you and you'll knock it out of the freakin' park.

    Best of luck to you!

    Remember--SMILE!

    -word
    Last edited by word; January 9th, 2014 at 10:34.
    Quote Originally Posted by 00Bear00 View Post
    When I read your post I suddenly feel like I am so far away from being crazy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ini View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ananasboat View Post
    It's festivals days like these on which I really try really hard to make up for not partying in college.
    yeah, because who needs free flowing drugs and alcohol fueling adventorous sex with taut, lithe young bodies when you could wander around a dying town in the freezing cold with a can of asahi super dry in your hand while some toothless old farmer shouts at you.

  2. #2
    Billy Big Bollocks Ini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Posts
    28,764

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    TLDR
    Great men of action never mind on occasion being ridiculous; in a sense it is part of their job.

  3. #3
    Feckless Manchild Otaku word's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    日本
    Posts
    18,421

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    No worries; that's why I put the TL;DR summary in there.
    Quote Originally Posted by 00Bear00 View Post
    When I read your post I suddenly feel like I am so far away from being crazy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ini View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ananasboat View Post
    It's festivals days like these on which I really try really hard to make up for not partying in college.
    yeah, because who needs free flowing drugs and alcohol fueling adventorous sex with taut, lithe young bodies when you could wander around a dying town in the freezing cold with a can of asahi super dry in your hand while some toothless old farmer shouts at you.

  4. #4
    Senior Moment Antonath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Living on the edge of sanity
    Posts
    6,582

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    I skimmed, but that may be one of the best guides to getting through the JET interview - or any job interview - I've seen. I will add my two cents/yen/pence/currency-of-choice worth of advice:

    You are going to a foreign embassy to interview for a civil service position with a foreign government. Dress and behave as such.

    That means no naru-piece ties, no "quirky" neon-green nails, no jeans and t-shirt, no trying to impress the Japanese staff with your knowledge of the tea ceremony (unless they ask in the interview), and no acting like a university student.
    ...because Japan.

  5. #5
    Gizmoduck - blatherskite Gizmotech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    A depressingly cold place...
    Posts
    10,063

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Always remember there is a fine line between confidence and arrogance. You want to be on the right side.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cytrix View Post
    Organising anything with ALTs is like herding cats on catnip

    Quote Originally Posted by Antonath View Post
    We Jeeperneez are express all emotion through money. Wedding is happy money. Funeral is sad money. Izakaya is friendship money. Girl-bar is almost-sex money. But babby-borning is bery happy money, as no babby in Japan. All babby is special so we is givings much money as presento for babby.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Ini View Post
    TLDR
    This.

    Just kidding. I did read the whole thing, and found it very helpful. While it might seem like half of the stuff in the post should be common sense, just having this here as a reminder of how important those little things are helps a lot. Definitely will be sure to maintain a conscious effort to keep that smile on! Now it's just time to wait that one more month for an interview notification... hopefully!

  7. #7

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Nice write up! It definitely varies by consulate, I know some just give out a list of the available times and first come (by phone) first served. Also, yeah, you should definitely not discuss the questions with people waiting to interview as that is a big no-no (of course you can say how it went, just no details).

    Be confident, look and act like an adult who is capable of flying around the world to work as a representative of your country, and don't want it so bad that it's creepy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ini
    If you are a empty husk of a man with no ambition come on jet, stay forever, drink yourself into a stupor every night, hurl abuse at people on itil like a roided up chimp at the feces olympics and die of thyroid cancer in your early 40s.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Wow, that was super interesting. Thanks a lot, Word.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Thank you Word that was a fantastically useful explanation. I will definitely be using as much of that information as I can.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    exciting! thanks for writing this!

  11. #11

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Just to add, I've been that ex-JET in the waiting room before. I promise, they are not there to vet applicants and take intricate notes on your every move. The ex-JET is mostly there to handle logistics - make sure people walk in the right direction, keep the DVDs going, refill water bottles. But if they're nice, and they probably are, they're also there to help relax and reassure the applicants, and to talk about life in Japan. Use your time in the waiting room to relax and talk a bit to get yourself ready for the interview.

    That being said, if somebody in the waiting room is a big jerk or a weirdo, the ex-JET will most likely pass that information on. Not talking about people who are just nervous and don't want to talk, more like if you start crying or if you play one-up Japanese knowledge with the ex-JET. If you're rude to them, or to consulate/embassy staff, expect that information to make it to the interviewers.

  12. #12
    Feckless Manchild Otaku word's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    日本
    Posts
    18,421

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    My apologies; I never meant to imply that the ex-JET in the waiting room was analyzing your every move or anything; I just think it's a smart move to use that opportunity to reinforce your positive, "super-you" attitude before hitting the actual interview!
    Quote Originally Posted by 00Bear00 View Post
    When I read your post I suddenly feel like I am so far away from being crazy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ini View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ananasboat View Post
    It's festivals days like these on which I really try really hard to make up for not partying in college.
    yeah, because who needs free flowing drugs and alcohol fueling adventorous sex with taut, lithe young bodies when you could wander around a dying town in the freezing cold with a can of asahi super dry in your hand while some toothless old farmer shouts at you.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by word View Post
    My apologies; I never meant to imply that the ex-JET in the waiting room was analyzing your every move or anything; I just think it's a smart move to use that opportunity to reinforce your positive, "super-you" attitude before hitting the actual interview!
    Nah, you didn't imply that, it's just one of those conspiracy-theory type things I've heard from applicants before.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Shincantsen View Post
    Nah, you didn't imply that, it's just one of those conspiracy-theory type things I've heard from applicants before.
    I've seen so many people say that kind of thing. I feel like they do it just to mess around with you!

    And thanks for the advice word =)

  15. #15
    VIP Nell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    London
    Posts
    59

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Word, thanks for the great post. It is hard to imagine that some people actually turn up to a job interview wearing crocs or something equally horrific but at least that's one less person for me to compete with! I'm starting to feel more or less confident about doing this interview now and realise that it's difficult to find and hide behind the 'perfect' answer; rather they decide I'm not right for the job than end up alone in a foreign country hating my life!

    Sent from my C5303 using Tapatalk

  16. #16
    Senior Member Aurano's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    230

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    You must be psyched Nell. I think if I got that long awaited e-mail, or letter, it would be that feeling like someone has swung a cricket bat in my stomach.

  17. #17
    Gizmoduck - blatherskite Gizmotech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    A depressingly cold place...
    Posts
    10,063

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by word View Post
    My apologies; I never meant to imply that the ex-JET in the waiting room was analyzing your every move or anything; I just think it's a smart move to use that opportunity to reinforce your positive, "super-you" attitude before hitting the actual interview!
    Quote Originally Posted by Shincantsen View Post
    Nah, you didn't imply that, it's just one of those conspiracy-theory type things I've heard from applicants before.
    Really... if I were interviewing I would absolutely have them keeping tabs on the people and watching what they do. Hell, I used to do that when I was hiring at head office. Mind you Tory was just a snoopy person in general, but she was very good at telling me what people said when they left and came in which I wasn't aware of in the hiring room.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cytrix View Post
    Organising anything with ALTs is like herding cats on catnip

    Quote Originally Posted by Antonath View Post
    We Jeeperneez are express all emotion through money. Wedding is happy money. Funeral is sad money. Izakaya is friendship money. Girl-bar is almost-sex money. But babby-borning is bery happy money, as no babby in Japan. All babby is special so we is givings much money as presento for babby.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    288

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    I almost wish they were as strict and sneaky as the rumours have it but they aren't. The year my friend got in a guy showed up in jeans, sat down next to my friend and asked "so what's this program about? What do they want to hear in this interview? I just saw the poster, looked like good money, and I figured I speak English sounds good. I don't have the money to travel and they're going to pay me to travel!"
    He got in.
    He did get a really rural island placement (which his two subsequent successors have loved), hated it and left after one year, threatened to quit a few times before that but still.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Quote Originally Posted by AVNicholls View Post
    I almost wish they were as strict and sneaky as the rumours have it but they aren't. The year my friend got in a guy showed up in jeans, sat down next to my friend and asked "so what's this program about? What do they want to hear in this interview? I just saw the poster, looked like good money, and I figured I speak English sounds good. I don't have the money to travel and they're going to pay me to travel!"
    He got in.
    He did get a really rural island placement (which his two subsequent successors have loved), hated it and left after one year, threatened to quit a few times before that but still.
    This should really emphasise to people that getting the job absolutely isn't about persuading them how much you love Japan and that if you come across as too invested you'll be less likely to get in. I mean sure it's an outlier but there are plenty of people who obsess over this damn job whereas almost all the people actually here seem like they weren't that bothered about JET or Japan or were good at hiding their japanophilia.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Word's Formerly Secret Interview Advice

    Thanks for sharing your experience and advice Word.

    Any interview I have been on before the interviewer is more interested in your personality than whatever you have written down on your resume. Part of the job as I understand it is to be an "unofficial ambassador" for whatever your country you are representing. Makes sense to me that they want to see that you aren't a total weirdo and can hold a conversation.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •