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Thread: Examples of successful classes

  1. #21

    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    I'd like to add, that it was a 5 minute activity - from Hi Friends Lesson 7 - show a tiny corner of the picture and get them to guess using English "It's a _____." First class loved it, second class was a snoozefest.

    But it was still better than the 'let's repeat the vocabulary x26 different words (which 90% of the students will almost never use again) that the homeroom teacher suggested. Classes that aren't motivated going in are typically a lost cause, especially when 50% of the students (or more) can't be bothered to bring their materials to class.

    Although, I've had much more success with peer-pressure and big projects. Have students work together to write a poster about a foreign country/put on a play/skit, they're much more interested.

  2. #22
    Feckless Manchild Otaku word's Avatar
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotech View Post
    Or you could tell the teacher to stuff it on the ALT must show them the world (this isn't Aladdin, don't need some scruffy upstart to show the kids where the good shit is), and actually just teach the class back on target. If there is no target, then start suggesting projects and activities which require multiple classes to implement and complete where THEY go and research this shit and present it.

    (Frankly, sounds like your teachers just expect you to be the entertainment and you've fallen into the trap).

    Also, I despise full lesson games. I just won't do it. As soon as I stopped trying to listen to their demands on shit my performance skyrocketed, and so did student involvement.
    I agree with half of this. You've said you're leaving in August, anyway--why not just do what you want? You can pretty much do anything at this point, short of standing in front of the class and waving your d*ck around (and that might actually be within the realm of possibility).

    I'm not as opposed to games and "fun" activities as Giz is (so long as said games and activities have very clear learning goals and are actually conducive to achieving them; "time-waster" games are awful and must be stopped), but I do think he's got the right idea here: if you've been following the instructions that the JTEs are giving you and are unhappy with the results, then stop following their instructions. Find what works for YOU and do it.
    Last edited by word; December 12th, 2014 at 10:58.
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    When I read your post I suddenly feel like I am so far away from being crazy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ananasboat View Post
    It's festivals days like these on which I really try really hard to make up for not partying in college.
    yeah, because who needs free flowing drugs and alcohol fueling adventorous sex with taut, lithe young bodies when you could wander around a dying town in the freezing cold with a can of asahi super dry in your hand while some toothless old farmer shouts at you.

  3. #23
    Gizmoduck - blatherskite Gizmotech's Avatar
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    I'm not opposed to fun activities. I will do an entire class of restaurant communication practice where half the class are customers half are restaurateurs, they've made their menu, and are navigating a dialogue script multiple times until the responses and patterns become memorized. Mind you the dialogue script I make have multiple levels of complexity, which the student can choose or choose not to use. It also is another example of "leaving the teacher's instructions" because they said we're gonna practice this part of the text, which was like 6 lines, and I was like "The kids might be the worst in the prefecture, but they're not THIS dumb".

    the kids have a lot of fun, I enjoy it, it reinforces the activity, life is great. What I mean by games is shit like "write a word on the paper, crumple up the paper, throw them around the room, go find a paper, and now go find whose paper it is." While great in theory for a team building activity of adults, it's a fucking waste of time with children and turns into a whole class of doing sweet fuck all regardless of how well planned/executed/supported it is.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cytrix View Post
    Organising anything with ALTs is like herding cats on catnip

    Quote Originally Posted by Antonath View Post
    We Jeeperneez are express all emotion through money. Wedding is happy money. Funeral is sad money. Izakaya is friendship money. Girl-bar is almost-sex money. But babby-borning is bery happy money, as no babby in Japan. All babby is special so we is givings much money as presento for babby.

  4. #24

    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Yeah I've totally fallen into doing what they want. And that's where my hatred of Mariah comes in. One of my JTEs, who's my old sup, only does sh!t her way. So for this Christmas lesson she replays that song 4 TIMES in a single class, when the worksheet I made was purposely made so that it would only take one play through for the students to complete, because I know listening to the same thing even 2 extra times for no reason is boring as hell. And then she reads the lyrics through translating it to Japanese line for line, when they have just received a handout with the English and Japanese side by side. Dafuq?

    And now I'm stuck in this zone where I've fooled myself into thinking that my classes are f#ckall if there's no presentation.

    Despite the students back home being different, using a PowerPoint or showing a video were considered a special lesson; a treat at times. And that's how I feel it should be.

    That said, I'd much rather do a PowerPoint than do model and repeat x-number of vocab words from the textbook.

    Thanks for all of your advice so far! I hope we can keep this discussion going.

    Do any of have a good activity that works well at rowdy schools?

  5. #25
    Feckless Manchild Otaku word's Avatar
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotech View Post
    What I mean by games is shit like "write a word on the paper, crumple up the paper, throw them around the room, go find a paper, and now go find whose paper it is." While great in theory for a team building activity of adults, it's a fucking waste of time with children and turns into a whole class of doing sweet fuck all regardless of how well planned/executed/supported it is.
    I get that; that's more what I was talking about when I ranted about "time-waster" games. If the game is designed to fill up a class period, rather than fulfill a learning goal, and doesn't actually result in learning of any kind, it sucks, even if the kids have a good time doing it. Might as well just give 'em all a DS and have 'em play Monster Hunter or some sh*t.
    Quote Originally Posted by 00Bear00 View Post
    When I read your post I suddenly feel like I am so far away from being crazy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ananasboat View Post
    It's festivals days like these on which I really try really hard to make up for not partying in college.
    yeah, because who needs free flowing drugs and alcohol fueling adventorous sex with taut, lithe young bodies when you could wander around a dying town in the freezing cold with a can of asahi super dry in your hand while some toothless old farmer shouts at you.

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by Master of The Universe :D View Post
    Do any of have a good activity that works well at rowdy schools?
    Anything that lets kids be pricks to eachother. One of my favourite lessons at my 'low grade don't even try school' was to get the students to make up 'dark secrets' about their friends. I heard the most fantastic, work-unsafe vocab that lesson - but it was all in English, goddamnit, because they wanted me to be in on the joke.

    Not necessarily recommending exactly this approach, of course... But it's something to consider.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggit View Post
    Old Snow wouldn't have said that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Zolrak 22 View Post
    You are like the secret boss battle they only advertised back when the game was being developed.

  7. #27

    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by word View Post
    You can pretty much do anything at this point, short of standing in front of the class and waving your d*ck around (and that might actually be within the realm of possibility).
    Unfortunately, not possible - d*ck too small.

    I followed the advice you all have given so far and this previous lesson (I'm at my academically worst school today) I played Jeopardy the whole lesson.

    GREAT SUCCESS!

    At one point it was clear that there were only 3 teams in the running to win and yet all the teams were trying the damnedest to get points all the way through.

    No candy even.

    Happy days.

    *I tried to upload the zipped file, but it won't go through...*

  8. #28

    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by SomePeopleJustSaySnow View Post
    Anything that lets kids be pricks to each other. One of my favourite lessons at my 'low grade don't even try school' was to get the students to make up 'dark secrets' about their friends.
    How'd you introduce that and what kind of parameters/ guides did you give the kids? If I imagine doing that at today's school, I'd probably give them as much freedom with it as possible because otherwise they'd zone out anyway.

    TOO MUCH ENGLISH ON WORKSHEET = SLEEP

  9. #29
    Ghost of Ecru SomePeopleJustSaySnow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    I agreed with the JTE on a very tame dark secret I could guess about him, and a much harsher one about me - then I did a few practice guesses about the students, a few who were into it and a few who were ambivalent. The ones who were into it didn't need any encouragement, the ones who were ambivalent became less so because they wanted to understand the joke.

    This is in a visit school where one of the kids in that class introduced herself as 'I have bisexual with her' though, so YMMV.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggit View Post
    Old Snow wouldn't have said that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Zolrak 22 View Post
    You are like the secret boss battle they only advertised back when the game was being developed.

  10. #30
    Senior Member par92186's Avatar
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    MOTU, here are some of my warm-up/review games I use in all my lessons. Feel free to use any of them. Hopefully they can alleviate some of your stress. I typically always reward the winning team with candy.

    Warm-Up/Review Games



    1. Shititori: Word Quiz
    · Whole class game. Teacher writes a word on the board and students must come up one-at-a-time and use the last letter of the written word to start a new word underneath it.

    2. Sentence Quiz
    · Whole class game. Teacher writes a sentence on the board and students must use the letters of the sentence to make a word

    3. Castles
    · Group game. Students decide a team name and teacher draws a castle for each group on the board. Teacher asks a question and students raise their hands to answer. If they are correct, they can attack another castle or build up their castle.

    4. Bingo
    · Individual game. Teacher makes grid paper for students. Students choose words to write in the blanks.

    5. Boggle
    · Group activity. Students are given a piece of paper. Teacher draws a 3x3 grid on the board and asks for letters to fill-in the grid. Students have 2 minutes to write down as many words as they can. At the end have students read the words aloud to check.

    6. Hot Seat
    · Group activity. A student from each group sits at the front of the class facing their friends. Teacher writes a word on the board and students must use English to give hints to the hot seat. Hot seat must raise hand and guess the answer.

    7. Crossfire
    · Individual game. Ask the class to stand. Teacher asks a question and students raise their hand to answer. If they are correct they choose “across” or down” and that entire row of students sits. Loser is the last student standing.

    8. Behind my back
    · Whole class activity. Choose a student to sit at the front of the classroom facing the chalkboard. Ask a classmate to read or make a sentence and the student at the front must guess who said it.





    9. Bomber Man
    · Whole class activity. Have the class stand. Explain that you will ask a question. Have the students raise their hand and answer. If correct they become the bomber man and the student to their left, right, front, and back sit down. Last student standing is the loser.
    VARIATIONS:
    · For the second round, the bomb becomes bigger. When it explodes, the vertical and horizontal lines from where the "bomber" is located must all sit down.
    o Naname Bomb: Naname means 'diagonal'.
    o Jump Bomb: The student chooses a direction (left, right, front or back) and the bomb jumps the first student in that direction but the rest of the students in that line sits down.
    · Tampin Bomb: Tampin means 'only one'. Meaning, only that one student sits down. NOTE: I would suggest only allowing a certain number of these bombs otherwise the game could go the entire class time.

    10. Categories
    · Group game. Students need scrap paper. Write a category on the board and in groups students have 1-2 mins to write as many words that fit that category. Have students read answers afterward to check.

    11. Have you ever…
    · Whole class game. Students make a circle and one student starts in the middle. The middle student asks a person sitting down a “have you ever” question. If the student answers yes they change.
    Quote Originally Posted by BeckyJones
    you will soon learn... Imagine the worst people you knew in college. Now imagine them trying to continue their college life in another country, constantly talking shit about each other and their foreign country like it is shit... only to be the shittiest of the bunch.

    now imagine the people who don't fit into that, and are actually shittier.... that is ITIL.

  11. #31
    Gizmoduck - blatherskite Gizmotech's Avatar
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post

    11. Have you ever…
    · Whole class game. Students make a circle and one student starts in the middle. The middle student asks a person sitting down a “have you ever” question. If the student answers yes they change.

    God, what a boring game to play?

    Have you ever been to kyoto? (everyone yes)
    Have you ever eaten sushi? (everyone yes)
    Have you ever fucked shiori? (everyone yes)
    Have you ever slept in class? (everyone yes)

    The kids have no unique experiences to speak of.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cytrix View Post
    Organising anything with ALTs is like herding cats on catnip

    Quote Originally Posted by Antonath View Post
    We Jeeperneez are express all emotion through money. Wedding is happy money. Funeral is sad money. Izakaya is friendship money. Girl-bar is almost-sex money. But babby-borning is bery happy money, as no babby in Japan. All babby is special so we is givings much money as presento for babby.

  12. #32
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by SomePeopleJustSaySnow View Post
    This is in a visit school where one of the kids in that class introduced herself as 'I have bisexual with her' though, so YMMV.
    Quote Originally Posted by 00Bear00 View Post
    When I read your post I suddenly feel like I am so far away from being crazy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ini View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ananasboat View Post
    It's festivals days like these on which I really try really hard to make up for not partying in college.
    yeah, because who needs free flowing drugs and alcohol fueling adventorous sex with taut, lithe young bodies when you could wander around a dying town in the freezing cold with a can of asahi super dry in your hand while some toothless old farmer shouts at you.

  13. #33

    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    Shititori
    ImageUploadedByTapatalk1418358003.114448.jpg?
    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    I typically always reward the winning team with candy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggit View Post
    But what if we reverse the polarity of the quantum string theory? According to uncertainty principle there are infinite worlds out there, so it stands to reason schrodinger's cat is alive in one of them.


    Quote Originally Posted by Apollo87;
    U da real mvp.

  14. #34
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    MOTU, here are some of my warm-up/review games I use in all my lessons. Feel free to use any of them. Hopefully they can alleviate some of your stress. I typically always reward the winning team with candy.

    Warm-Up/Review Games



    1. Shititori: Word Quiz
    · Whole class game. Teacher writes a word on the board and students must come up one-at-a-time and use the last letter of the written word to start a new word underneath it.
    I've done shiritori before, but I am very suspicious of its educational utility and benefit. It comes dangerously close to a time-waster. If I do it, I do teams, I don't permit books or dictionaries, don't count misspelled words, and words with more than six or seven letters count as two points. If at all possible, I separate the two teams by as much as possible or make them work on opposite sides of the classroom. I always start with words that end in different letters for each team.

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    2. Sentence Quiz
    · Whole class game. Teacher writes a sentence on the board and students must use the letters of the sentence to make a word
    What is the learning objective of this activity?

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    3. Castles
    · Group game. Students decide a team name and teacher draws a castle for each group on the board. Teacher asks a question and students raise their hands to answer. If they are correct, they can attack another castle or build up their castle.
    How many attacks destroy an opposing team's castle? Do you require each student on a team answer a question before a student can answer twice, or will is this an activity that highlights the abilities of the best students in class?

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    4. Bingo
    · Individual game. Teacher makes grid paper for students. Students choose words to write in the blanks.
    Lots of ALTs I know do BINGO. What is the learning objective of this activity?

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    5. Boggle
    · Group activity. Students are given a piece of paper. Teacher draws a 3x3 grid on the board and asks for letters to fill-in the grid. Students have 2 minutes to write down as many words as they can. At the end have students read the words aloud to check.
    What is the learning objective of this activity? How much time per lesson do you usually spend on it?

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    6. Hot Seat
    · Group activity. A student from each group sits at the front of the class facing their friends. Teacher writes a word on the board and students must use English to give hints to the hot seat. Hot seat must raise hand and guess the answer.
    How do you choose which student will sit in front of the class? Have you ever had a student in the hot seat break down crying?

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    7. Crossfire
    · Individual game. Ask the class to stand. Teacher asks a question and students raise their hand to answer. If they are correct they choose “across” or down” and that entire row of students sits. Loser is the last student standing.
    I do this activity as a warm-up sometimes, too, but I have to be cautious. It's another one that highlights the abilities of the best students in the class. It might be better to toss out the "raising hands" part and instead choose students at random (a set of cards bearing the students' names that you made and laminated at the beginning of the term helps with this--especially if you can't remember all your students' names). Also, don't call the last kid standing a loser, of course. If I ever have a last kid standing, I usually give them a reward of some kind (I have a sort of point card system).

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    8. Behind my back
    · Whole class activity. Choose a student to sit at the front of the classroom facing the chalkboard. Ask a classmate to read or make a sentence and the student at the front must guess who said it.
    Like, from the sound of their voice? What's the learning goal?

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    9. Bomber Man
    · Whole class activity. Have the class stand. Explain that you will ask a question. Have the students raise their hand and answer. If correct they become the bomber man and the student to their left, right, front, and back sit down. Last student standing is the loser.
    VARIATIONS:
    · For the second round, the bomb becomes bigger. When it explodes, the vertical and horizontal lines from where the "bomber" is located must all sit down.
    o Naname Bomb: Naname means 'diagonal'.
    o Jump Bomb: The student chooses a direction (left, right, front or back) and the bomb jumps the first student in that direction but the rest of the students in that line sits down.
    · Tampin Bomb: Tampin means 'only one'. Meaning, only that one student sits down. NOTE: I would suggest only allowing a certain number of these bombs otherwise the game could go the entire class time.
    A variant of Crossfire? Interesting. Why wouldn't you use "Diagonal Bomb" and "Single Bomb" instead of the Japanese equivalents? Seems silly to toss random Japanese, especially when repeated use of the English words would increase their vocabulary. Again, I'd say it might be better to select students at random, rather than have them raise their hands.

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    10. Categories
    · Group game. Students need scrap paper. Write a category on the board and in groups students have 1-2 mins to write as many words that fit that category. Have students read answers afterward to check.
    I kinda like this, although the learning objectives seem a bit vague. It does seem like a good warm-up, especially if you get creative with the categories. What sort of categories do you usually offer?

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    11. Have you ever…
    · Whole class game. Students make a circle and one student starts in the middle. The middle student asks a person sitting down a “have you ever” question. If the student answers yes they change.
    Hmm. This seems like it might become problematic, with a lot of potential for bullying and favoritism behaviours. Also, the problem that Giz mentioned:

    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotech View Post
    God, what a boring game to play?

    Have you ever been to kyoto? (everyone yes)
    Have you ever eaten sushi? (everyone yes)
    Have you ever fucked shiori? (everyone yes)
    Have you ever slept in class? (everyone yes)

    The kids have no unique experiences to speak of.
    If the kids are the ones thinking of the questions, this seems like exactly the sort of problem that would emerge. Maybe if you added some cards with relevant vocabulary words on them or something, the kid draws a card at random, and the question had to use the word somehow. Also, maybe they have to go in order, rather than simply choose another student?
    Last edited by word; December 12th, 2014 at 13:45.
    Quote Originally Posted by 00Bear00 View Post
    When I read your post I suddenly feel like I am so far away from being crazy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ini View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Ananasboat View Post
    It's festivals days like these on which I really try really hard to make up for not partying in college.
    yeah, because who needs free flowing drugs and alcohol fueling adventorous sex with taut, lithe young bodies when you could wander around a dying town in the freezing cold with a can of asahi super dry in your hand while some toothless old farmer shouts at you.

  15. #35

    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    I will say, when I make a powerpoint, I always try to throw in celebs or anime characters the kids really like. My kids seem to really flip when a few of the slides have stuff they're interested in.
    I came here to laugh at you.

  16. #36
    Senior Member par92186's Avatar
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by Gizmotech View Post
    God, what a boring game to play?

    Have you ever been to kyoto? (everyone yes)
    Have you ever eaten sushi? (everyone yes)
    Have you ever fucked shiori? (everyone yes)
    Have you ever slept in class? (everyone yes)

    The kids have no unique experiences to speak of.

    I didn't say they were 100% amazing and perfect. Just some helpful ideas for a teacher in need to modify. Why be a dickhead about it? Grow up Peter Pan.
    Quote Originally Posted by BeckyJones
    you will soon learn... Imagine the worst people you knew in college. Now imagine them trying to continue their college life in another country, constantly talking shit about each other and their foreign country like it is shit... only to be the shittiest of the bunch.

    now imagine the people who don't fit into that, and are actually shittier.... that is ITIL.

  17. #37
    Senior Member par92186's Avatar
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by word View Post
    I've done shiritori before, but I am very suspicious of its educational utility and benefit. It comes dangerously close to a time-waster. If I do it, I do teams, I don't permit books or dictionaries, don't count misspelled words, and words with more than six or seven letters count as two points. If at all possible, I separate the two teams by as much as possible or make them work on opposite sides of the classroom. I always start with words that end in different letters for each team.

    What is the learning objective of this activity?

    How many attacks destroy an opposing team's castle? Do you require each student on a team answer a question before a student can answer twice, or will is this an activity that highlights the abilities of the best students in class?

    Lots of ALTs I know do BINGO. What is the learning objective of this activity?

    What is the learning objective of this activity? How much time per lesson do you usually spend on it?

    How do you choose which student will sit in front of the class? Have you ever had a student in the hot seat break down crying?

    I do this activity as a warm-up sometimes, too, but I have to be cautious. It's another one that highlights the abilities of the best students in the class. It might be better to toss out the "raising hands" part and instead choose students at random (a set of cards bearing the students' names that you made and laminated at the beginning of the term helps with this--especially if you can't remember all your students' names). Also, don't call the last kid standing a loser, of course. If I ever have a last kid standing, I usually give them a reward of some kind (I have a sort of point card system).

    Like, from the sound of their voice? What's the learning goal?

    A variant of Crossfire? Interesting. Why wouldn't you use "Diagonal Bomb" and "Single Bomb" instead of the Japanese equivalents? Seems silly to toss random Japanese, especially when repeated use of the English words would increase their vocabulary. Again, I'd say it might be better to select students at random, rather than have them raise their hands.

    I kinda like this, although the learning objectives seem a bit vague. It does seem like a good warm-up, especially if you get creative with the categories. What sort of categories do you usually offer?

    Hmm. This seems like it might become problematic, with a lot of potential for bullying and favoritism behaviours. Also, the problem that Giz mentioned:

    If the kids are the ones thinking of the questions, this seems like exactly the sort of problem that would emerge. Maybe if you added some cards with relevant vocabulary words on them or something, the kid draws a card at random, and the question had to use the word somehow. Also, maybe they have to go in order, rather than simply choose another student?

    Most of these activities are warm-up games. The learning object is simply get the students motivated/interested to begin studying english. If you're teaching a lesson on a specific topic modify the game around that main topic. They're just to get the students warmed up for 5-10 minutes. Of course, i don't play games for my entire lessons, but I do always and end with a short game with a grammar lesson sandwiched in-between. I haven't had any problems or issues.

    In regards to some of the rules. They're more of guidelines. Of course make whatever rules you want, idc. It's your lesson after all. Be creative.
    Last edited by par92186; December 12th, 2014 at 14:26.
    Quote Originally Posted by BeckyJones
    you will soon learn... Imagine the worst people you knew in college. Now imagine them trying to continue their college life in another country, constantly talking shit about each other and their foreign country like it is shit... only to be the shittiest of the bunch.

    now imagine the people who don't fit into that, and are actually shittier.... that is ITIL.

  18. #38
    Ghost of Ecru SomePeopleJustSaySnow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by word View Post
    Also, don't call the last kid standing a loser, of course.
    Why? He lost the game. If you reward that kid, how does that make the second-to-last kid feel?
    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggit View Post
    Old Snow wouldn't have said that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Zolrak 22 View Post
    You are like the secret boss battle they only advertised back when the game was being developed.

  19. #39
    Senior Member par92186's Avatar
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    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by SomePeopleJustSaySnow View Post
    Why? He lost the game. If you reward that kid, how does that make the second-to-last kid feel?

    haha yeah i feel bad for the last kid. I usually give the last student out a small piece of candy to cheer them up.
    Quote Originally Posted by BeckyJones
    you will soon learn... Imagine the worst people you knew in college. Now imagine them trying to continue their college life in another country, constantly talking shit about each other and their foreign country like it is shit... only to be the shittiest of the bunch.

    now imagine the people who don't fit into that, and are actually shittier.... that is ITIL.

  20. #40

    Default Re: Examples of successful classes

    Quote Originally Posted by par92186 View Post
    I usually give the last student out a small piece of candy to cheer them up.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggit View Post
    But what if we reverse the polarity of the quantum string theory? According to uncertainty principle there are infinite worlds out there, so it stands to reason schrodinger's cat is alive in one of them.


    Quote Originally Posted by Apollo87;
    U da real mvp.

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