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Thread: Placement Question

  1. #1

    Default Placement Question

    I got accepted this year and i honestly don't care where i am placed as anywhere will be a great experience but i am curious about one thing. Has anyone who made placement requests due to the location of family in Japan (my wife is Japanese and is going with me) been placed in or not so far from one of the places they requested? Like i said, it doesn't really bother me. I'm just curious to see if it happens often or there seems to be a better chance of at least getting placed even in the same general area or a city closer to your request.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Placement Question

    I have a friend who lives near her mother's side of the family. She specifically mentioned that she wanted a place in this area for that reason. But, ESID, blahblahblah, you may get placed nearby or you may be a few hours away. No real guarantee.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Placement Question

    Thanks, pretty much what i thought.

  4. #4
    Weirdest ITIL member. haitch40's Avatar
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    Default Re: Placement Question

    I believe it is a case of they will try and give you what you requested but it is ultimately down to whether the areas want you.
    Last edited by haitch40; March 31st, 2015 at 17:56.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Placement Question

    Someone in my prefecture requested to be placed near her grandparents. She ended up about 2 to 3 hours away (by car). She visits them a little less than once a month.
    I came here to laugh at you.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Placement Question

    Just wondering, when we receive our placement, it's initially just the prefecture right? Sometime in May? And then we get the BOE info in June-ish?

  7. #7

    Default Re: Placement Question

    It depends on if you're a prefecturally hired or city hired JET. Prefecturally hired generally teach at high schools and city teach at middle and elementary schools. If you're prefecturally hired you'll just get the name of the prefecture, and if you're city hired you'll get the city name.
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  8. #8

    Default Re: Placement Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Shincantsen View Post
    It depends on if you're a prefecturally hired or city hired JET. Prefecturally hired generally teach at high schools and city teach at middle and elementary schools. If you're prefecturally hired you'll just get the name of the prefecture, and if you're city hired you'll get the city name.
    I didn't know that! Thanks for the info

  9. #9
    read half. react. BifCarbet's Avatar
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    Default Re: Placement Question

    It doesn't end there, though. I was given my city name when I first got my placement, then my predecessor contacted me telling me I was placed in a village about a 45-minute drive from the center of the city I was told. It was technically a part of that city, but really disconnected from everything. Wait until you hear from your contracting organization or predecessor to start making plans.
    Last edited by BifCarbet; April 1st, 2015 at 04:48.
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Placement Question

    Quote Originally Posted by BifCarbet View Post
    It doesn't end there, though. I was given my city name when I first got my placement, then my predecessor contacted me telling me I was placed in a village about a 45-minute drive from the center of the city I was told. It was technically a part of that city, but really disconnected from everything. Wait until you hear from your contracting organization or predecessor to start making plans.
    This is a common way Japanese cities work. The larger cities will claim the little towns surrounding them. It's mutually beneficial. The city gets the tax money, and the town gets the benefits of belonging to the city. Or some shit like that.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Placement Question

    I find that requests made in part because you have family there tend to be held with higher regard than requests to a location for other reasons.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Placement Question

    Lots of 'cities' have been formed through the liquidation of local town governments into larger municipalities to save money over the years. So that 'city' might really just be a collection of a couple dozen fairly disconnected or separated towns or villages. My placement works the same - my 'town' is a collection of 2 larger villages and about 3-4 tiny little hamlets. And it's about a 25 minute drive from one end to the other - the whole town's population is less than 10k as well.

  13. #13
    read half. react. BifCarbet's Avatar
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    Default Re: Placement Question

    Yep! Gappei-ing is really common. That's what my post was about. I was in a town that was amalgamated into the city in 2004, and it had very little in common with the bigger city. People downtown didn't even really know where it was or what was out there. So, I got my placement, looked it up, saw that there were about 150,000 people and that it was the terminus for a JR line, and got really excited. My town had 1500, and going to the station was not even a weekly occurrence. If I didn't have a car, I would have had access to one convenience store, one grocery store, one bank branch, one post office, two restaurants, one friendly bar, and a hospital I could reach by taxi.
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  14. #14
    Senior Member Fantasylife's Avatar
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    Default Re: Placement Question

    Quote Originally Posted by BifCarbet View Post
    Yep! Gappei-ing is really common. That's what my post was about. I was in a town that was amalgamated into the city in 2004, and it had very little in common with the bigger city. People downtown didn't even really know where it was or what was out there. So, I got my placement, looked it up, saw that there were about 150,000 people and that it was the terminus for a JR line, and got really excited. My town had 1500, and going to the station was not even a weekly occurrence. If I didn't have a car, I would have had access to one convenience store, one grocery store, one bank branch, one post office, two restaurants, one friendly bar, and a hospital I could reach by taxi.
    Just curious. Was it difficult to get your car? And do you find it affordable on a JET salary? You don't have to answer if I'm being too nosey. I'm just trying to get an idea of what I could expect should I be placed in an area that requires a car. Thanks!

  15. #15
    read half. react. BifCarbet's Avatar
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    Default Re: Placement Question

    I got my first car (1995 Toyota coupe) in a package of stuff for 30,000 yen from my predecessor. I also got a TV, table, heater, and other supplies. JETs usually tend to try to set up their successors, but that's not a guarantee. Cars in Japan are FAR cheaper than cars in America, if that is where you're from. Depending on your comfort level, you can find cars for cheap. You have to consider shaken (mandatory biannual inspection), insurance, and gasoline. Your supervisor should help you shop for a car if you need one. Shop around a bit. Try to get a car that has shaken included to eliminate the pain, or get an estimate for the dealer to perform the inspection. Insurance should be under $1000 or 100,000 yen per year. I would say that realistically, driving a car will cost you 250,000 to 400,000 per year, but part of that will offset train, taxi, and bus fares you avoid.

    You shouldn't have much trouble getting set up, and on the JET salary (unless you're sending everything home for loans or other obligations) driving a car is totally affordable.
    Last edited by BifCarbet; April 2nd, 2015 at 14:13.
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  16. #16

    Default Re: Placement Question

    Quote Originally Posted by BifCarbet View Post
    Insurance should be under $1000 or 100,000 yen per year..
    That isn't always the case. It will depend on the age and experience of the driver. (I know one girl who paid 1.5 times that, and she wasn't terribly young.) Also, BoEs may have specific requirements for insurance, and that can add up as well.
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  17. #17
    Feckless Manchild Otaku word's Avatar
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    Default Re: Placement Question

    Quote Originally Posted by BifCarbet View Post
    Cars in Japan are FAR cheaper than cars in America, if that is where you're from.
    This is true, with an important qualifier--OWNING a car in Japan is far more expensive than owning a car in the US.

    Quote Originally Posted by BifCarbet View Post
    You have to consider shaken (mandatory biannual inspection), insurance, and gasoline.
    This.

    Shakken is expensive and gets more expensive the older the car gets. Cars more than, what, 14 years old? have to have a sort of annual shakken performed. Expect this to run anywhere from $600-$1500 (or more) for a white-plate.

    Also, don't forget yearly taxes. Yellow plates (the tiny, underpowered death-traps they sell here) will be cheap, generally under $80/year. White plates are more expensive, around $350-$400/year for engines under 2000cc... and up from there. I owned a van that cost almost $700/year in taxes for a while. If you own a vehicle with a big V6 or V8, you may pay well over $1000/year. Keep this in mind before snapping up that nice-looking older SUV that seems to be so cheap.

    Quote Originally Posted by BifCarbet View Post
    Your supervisor should help you shop for a car if you need one.
    ESID. Keep in mind that this is NOT in your supervisor's job description and if s/he does so, s/he is going well above and beyond the call of duty for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by BifCarbet View Post
    You shouldn't have much trouble getting set up, and on the JET salary (unless you're sending everything home for loans or other obligations) driving a car is totally affordable.
    word
    Last edited by word; April 2nd, 2015 at 14:29. Reason: Typo.
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  18. #18
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    Default Re: Placement Question

    I'm glad I got mostly positive reviews. The costs definitely add up a bit, but the selling prices can be so low for a pretty decent car, that it's still way cheaper overall than the US.

    ESI definitely D. I meant "should" help if the person is kind-hearted. I'd hope that most supes would help.
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  19. #19

    Default Re: Placement Question

    Quote Originally Posted by BifCarbet View Post
    JETs usually tend to try to set up their successors, but that's not a guarantee.
    It's cheaper and easier for predecessors to hand the car down (money changing hands of course) than to get rid of the car and have the successor find their own. Shaken is a part of this. Which is why the car I drive is known as the ALT's car. It's been the car of 4 different ALTs over about 7 years now. And according to the log-book, this past shaken was the first time it needed any real repairs. It's a shitty little yellow plate, but for the amount of driving I do, it works just fine.

    If you're moving into a rural placement and your pred wants to sell you their car, it'll probably be cheaper than finding one on your own. But you need to ask when the shaken runs out and if there are any issues with the car (and hope they'll be honest.) Some predecessors find that they didn't save nearly enough over their JET career and end up trying to take their predecessors for as much as possible. Then use that info to see how much the same models are going for on some of Japan's car trading websites. Make sure you don't get taken.

    Insurance - there's mandatory insurance with optional extra coverage. Some of the COs will want you get the optional coverage. I think it's worth it, but it might get expensive if you're driving a real car (white plate) - but then again, just about everything is more expensive about white plate cars. Except if you want really want a hybrid.

  20. #20
    Billy Big Bollocks Ini's Avatar
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    Default Re: Placement Question

    hybrids are expensive, drink fuel, cost a fortune to replace the batteries etc. they are the biggest con in motoring. You'd have to be insane to buy a used hybrid.
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