Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Adult Conversation Class

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default Adult Conversation Class

    Does anyone here teach an adult conversation class?

    I am running out of ideas.

    My class range from quite high to medium ability.

    They like debates. Some like games. Some of them want to learn about my country. Some want to listen to music/sing songs(!) (I find the latter two difficult to link to conversation!)

    If you teach an adult class and have any ideas please reply! I am feeling a bit uninspired of late, so anything will be good!

    I think they would quite like to do another debate soon, so any topic ideas would be cool.

    So far we have done...

    Robot dogs V Real pets!

    Third World debt

    The Balloon Debate (the teacher lost, oh dear!!)

    Also I have played games like "Just a minute" and "Call my bluff"

    Cheers ma'dears

    Han X
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Tochigi-ken (from UK)
    Posts
    1,317

    Default

    I have an adult conversation class too.
    Here are some of the things we did which went really well....

    Aesop`s fables. I printed about 6 off from the internet and got them to read them out. After going through any tricky vocab and getting them to briefly summarise the stories, I asked them to guess what the moral to the stories were, without giving them the answer. Later, when we had read all 6 of the fables I chose, I wrote the correct morals on the board, and they had to work out which ones match the stotries.
    I found that conversation flowed pretty easily after...we discussed the morals themselves, tried to think of examples they could be applied, whether they agree with them or not, which was the most important and why etc etc.

    What`s your problem? This is a fun game they all seem to really enjoy. Each person has a secret "problem" given to them - ie "you can only speak in the future tense", "You must skip every 3rd word", "questions make you angry", "you can only ask questions" etc etc. Then you tell them that they are at a party , and that they must mingle with the other guests, trying to work out what everyone`s problems are.

    What animal am I?[/b] Here I gave everyone a picture of an endangered animal. After going through some vocab (like habitat,fur, carnivore etc) they had to describe their animal to the rest of their team. After that we went on to discuss the environment - what is the biggest environmental threat, what can we do about it, should we do anything about it, why etc...

    Roald Dahl Poem In this case I got hold of "the pig" from the net, and blanked out the rhyming words. They had to guess what they could be. They found this difficult but they said it was fun and they got something from it. Next we talked about the poem and this led us on to vegetarianism (in the poem, the pig, who realises his days are numbered, decides to eat the farmer before the farmer eats him). We talked about the reasons for vegetarianism, the benefts and drawbacks, whether anyone in the group could give up meat, veganism etc etc.

    Hope some of this is useful

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Hey, they are great ideas Dave, thanks tons!!

    The What's your problem? game idea sounds hilarious! (Is it from "Who's line is it anyway?")

    I recently bought a book of Roald Dahl short stories to read, and thought they might be good to use in my adult class... but wasn't quite sure how! The Dirty Beast poems are hilarious! Also Revolting Rhymes might be funny to use (even in Junior High School) as the fairytales are quite well known here too.

    (My books are all in a box in my attic at home though!! Hmmm )

    Do you remember where you found a copy of "The Pig?" on line?


    By the way, I've seen Aesop's Fables in Japanese... Did your class not already know them? Interesting. Like how you use the text to start a discussion theme.

    You're a star matey! :wink:
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Biggest lil town on Shikoku
    Posts
    867

    Default

    The problem with using music isn't that you can't discuss it, but that it's so idiomatic and usually related to culture or history.

    As a middle school student, my music teacher had us listen to Don McLean's American Pie and then try to figure out what all the symbolic phrases meant. It was difficult for us because of the generation gap, but it was a fun lesson.

    If they like listening to English music, and can understand the lyrics, you could probably have them listen to a song that uses lots of metaphors and ask them what they think the song is talking about.
    It is a solidly built word of just four letters, bracketed by rock-hard consonants. It ... explodes into space from a gate formed by the upper incisors and the lower lip. Then it slams to a dramatic glottal cough.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,149

    Default

    Thanks Quazarglow, Another gem!

    I shall be listening carefully for lyrics with metaphors all this week now!
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Hiroshima City
    Posts
    6,914

    Default

    If you wanna do a song, I found that 'Space Oddity' by David Bowie was easy to understand and the vocab is straightforward.
    "If you've got [a penis], or access to one, take a good look at it this evening and ask yourself: how can this possibly be the work of a sane God?"

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom (England)
    Posts
    354

    Default

    Can't you play that old classic pub game that used to be on TVAM with Timmy Mallet. Sit in a circle, someone says a word, the next person has to say a word that relates to it and so on, if they can't think of one quick, they have to do a forefeit. A good way of expanding your vocab especially if you think up tough words for the person next to you.

    But probably best not to have any punishments like downing a shot of vodka. Otherwise you'll have some very pissed people on the floor

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Congo
    Posts
    917

    Default

    The Deck of Conversations

    Materials: A deck of playing cards (with the jokers)

    Procedure:
    1. Students are each assigned the numbers 2 to 8 for different suits and write questions to find out interesting information about their classmates or their teacher.
    2. Place the deck of cards face down on the table.
    3. Ask the student to pick up the top card and read out what it is.
    4. Read the corresponding question or task. They must answer in English.
    5. Repeat steps two and three with the next student and so on.
    6. At the end, conduct a short feedback slot where you highlight errors or interesting information people found out during the activity.


    CARD TASKS / QUESTIONS
    Spades: Questions
    For the spade tasks, the speaker must ask a question to someone in the group. They can ask follow-up questions if they like.
    9 – Ask someone to spell their first and last name
    10 – Ask someone their phone number, address and email
    Jack – Ask someone what they did last weekend
    Queen – Ask someone about the last film they saw
    King – Ask someone about their family
    Ace – Ask someone the reasons they are learning English

    Clubs: Descriptions
    For the clubs tasks, the speaker must describe what is asked for at least one minute.
    9 – Describe yourself
    10 – Describe someone in your family
    Jack – Describe the room you are in
    Queen – Describe your flat
    King – Describe the city you are from
    Ace – Describe this game


    Hearts: Feelings and Opinions
    For the heart questions, everybody in the group must ask a follow-up question to the speaker after they have answered the question on the card.
    9 – What do you like doing in your free time?
    10 – What are the ingredients of a good marriage?
    Jack – Which do you prefer, summer or winter?
    Queen – What things make you angry?
    King – What would you like to change about yourself?
    Ace – What made you happy as a child?

    Diamonds: Ideals
    For the diamond questions, the speaker has to talk about an ideal of something on the card. The speaker has to talk for at least 30 seconds (or a minute!)
    9 – My ideal house or flat would be…
    10 – My ideal day off would be…
    Jack – My ideal job would be…
    Queen – My ideal teacher would be…
    King – My ideal partner would be…
    Ace – My ideal holiday would be…

    JOKER CARDS
    ASK ANY OF THE QUESTIONS OR GIVE ANY OF THE TASKS TO THE TEACHER!
    Give me my marker show me my line... surely this is it... the edge?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •