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Thread: Stuff to bring

  1. #101
    Gizmoduck - blatherskite Gizmotech's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggit View Post
    In my experience the best way to figure out what stuff means (if you've got a little Japanese) is to google "word 英語". There are a lot more resources out there for Japanese learners of English than vice versa. Also you can check that the English makes sense and sounds natural whereas you may not be so sure about the Japanese - which means that it's better to focus on Japanese written for Japanese than that written for Japanese learners. For example:

    http://hapaeikaiwa.com/2014/04/09/%E3%80%8C%E5%BE%AE%E5%A6%99%E3%80%8D%E3%81%AF%E8%8B%B1%E8%AA%9E%E3%81%A7%EF%BC%9F/
    Jiggit is spot on. I spend a lot of time doing exactly this when I'm trying to figure out the nuances of a Japanese word.
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  2. #102
    read half. react. BifCarbet's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    Also, for more complex concepts or specific items, I use the English Wikipedia page, then click on the Japanese button, OR do it the other way around. I read a bit to make sure it's exactly the same thing and check for a slight difference. Even if you can't read the Japanese, a picture or a few English words in the article should help.

    Wouldn't work for BIMYOU, but it works for stuff like 文部科学省 or United Nations.
    Last edited by BifCarbet; May 15th, 2015 at 09:56.
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  3. #103
    Crustacean Sensation Ebi's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggit View Post
    In my experience the best way to figure out what stuff means (if you've got a little Japanese) is to google "word 英語". There are a lot more resources out there for Japanese learners of English than vice versa. Also you can check that the English makes sense and sounds natural whereas you may not be so sure about the Japanese - which means that it's better to focus on Japanese written for Japanese than that written for Japanese learners. For example:

    http://hapaeikaiwa.com/2014/04/09/%E3%80%8C%E5%BE%AE%E5%A6%99%E3%80%8D%E3%81%AF%E8%8B%B1%E8%AA%9E%E3%81%A7%EF%BC%9F/
    This is excellent advice. I do the same thing. Plus if you can read Japanese fairly well, sites like chiebukuro (Japan's equivalent of Yahoo Answers) will usually have pretty detailed explanations of the nuance in different words and phrases.

    Also you can try entering snippets of a sentence you want to say in Google in Japanese and see what pops up. Odds are there are some examples of it being used by a native speaker. But if the only sources appear to be sites like lang8, your sentence is probably unnnatural.

    Trying to translate whole sentences almost never works out properly, but if you break it down into parts you can get a decent idea.

  4. #104

    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    Quote Originally Posted by Jiggit View Post
    In my experience the best way to figure out what stuff means (if you've got a little Japanese) is to google "word 英語". There are a lot more resources out there for Japanese learners of English than vice versa. Also you can check that the English makes sense and sounds natural whereas you may not be so sure about the Japanese - which means that it's better to focus on Japanese written for Japanese than that written for Japanese learners. For example:

    http://hapaeikaiwa.com/2014/04/09/%E3%80%8C%E5%BE%AE%E5%A6%99%E3%80%8D%E3%81%AF%E8%8B%B1%E8%AA%9E%E3%81%A7%EF%BC%9F/
    Another good trick if you read Japanese well is to google a Japanese word + とは or って. This is the format usually used when people ask what something means. The first hits will usually be to chiebukuro or to some other question asking site and will usually have an upvoted answer at the top. You can also add in 語源 ("etymology") to the search to find what the history of a word is. Great for random katakana words!

  5. #105
    Cute Frankenstein genkispirit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    For my omiyagi I'm thinking about bringing water colour prints of the Museum I work at. They are beautifully rendered, dirt cheap, and super light and only $3.00 per print. I work at a Heritage Museum that has the actual buildings on property. They are prints of the same buildings that were used in my local area from the late 1800s to the mid 1900s. Would that be a well-received gift?

  6. #106
    Open the doors, Hoff. BambooTelegraph's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    Quote Originally Posted by genkispirit View Post
    For my omiyagi I'm thinking about bringing water colour prints of the Museum I work at. They are beautifully rendered, dirt cheap, and super light and only $3.00 per print. I work at a Heritage Museum that has the actual buildings on property. They are prints of the same buildings that were used in my local area from the late 1800s to the mid 1900s. Would that be a well-received gift?
    Is it edible?

    I kid, I kid! How many were you thinking of giving?

  7. #107
    Cute Frankenstein genkispirit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    Quote Originally Posted by BambooTelegraph View Post
    Is it edible?

    I kid, I kid! How many were you thinking of giving?

    I was thinking these kind of things would be better received by Teachers, Faculty and the people helping me get settled. I was thinking of bringing about 10, gotta milk that employee discount.

  8. #108
    Open the doors, Hoff. BambooTelegraph's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    Quote Originally Posted by genkispirit View Post
    I was thinking these kind of things would be better received by Teachers, Faculty and the people helping me get settled. I was thinking of bringing about 10, gotta milk that employee discount.
    That doesn't sound too bad!

    However, just for some perspective: When I came a few years ago, I brought two sets of omiyage. A few personal gifts and lots of friendly gifts. The personal gifts were not-too-expensive gifts for my JTE's and my supervisors, while the friendly gifts were just cheaper edibles that I could give to everyone else. As it turned out, I had more than enough personal gifts, but I almost did not have enough friendly gifts. Your school(s) may/will have more than just 10 people (total combined I've got more than 70 different teachers, faculty and people who I interact with on a weekly basis).

    In your case, it might help to have two tiers of items for omiyage. As more information becomes available and you'll be able to contact your predecessor, it might not hurt to ask them regarding numbers of teachers/faculty and people who will be helping you get settled.
    Last edited by BambooTelegraph; May 25th, 2015 at 01:32.

  9. #109
    Cute Frankenstein genkispirit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    I find the problem with things that are edible is that most of the stuff in Canada, I have found through experience, is far too sweet for most Japanese people. It usually takes them a while to accustomed to it. A lot of the cookies and things that you can get here you can get in Asia. We have a lot of local post cards that have some really nice local images on them, that are really cheap. May be I can use those for my small gifts. Although, I do like the aforementioned coffee idea. We have an amazing local brew that might nice for the office.

  10. #110
    Open the doors, Hoff. BambooTelegraph's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    Quote Originally Posted by genkispirit View Post
    Although, I do like the aforementioned coffee idea. We have an amazing local brew that might nice for the office.
    Yes. This is brilliant! Japanese office coffee has the unfortunate characteristic of being less than satisfying... Good Luck!

  11. #111

    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    As we've said before, if you get something for the whole office everyone will understand and be thankful. If they like it too that's just an added bonus, it's the thought that mainly counts.

    If you buy individual gifts they may well be pleased but they'll probably also be surprised and not sure what they're for. One to your supervisor for helping you setup should be fine.

  12. #112

    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    I was going to bring some of Wigan's famous "Uncle Joe's Mint Balls" but I read somewhere that Japanese people don't like mint flavours?

  13. #113
    Feckless Manchild Otaku word's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    Doesn't really matter if they don't like it; it really is the thought that counts. There's plenty of mint-flavored stuff sold here, though.
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  14. #114
    Perpetually confused. johnny's Avatar
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    Default Stuff to bring

    There is a lot of mint gum and mint mints here for sure. I hate mint chocolate so I never look for it, but I assume they have that too.

    Edit: Word and Jiggs are right. Your Japanese co-workers will accept your gifts like people in most places. They will genuinely appreciate anything you bring them. If the gift comes from your hometown, I think they'd appreciate it for the novelty alone.
    Last edited by johnny; May 26th, 2015 at 09:37.
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    Teach them something new?? Are you mad? All you do in Japan is rehash the same stuff over and over for 15 years. Hello song, what do you like sports? and fruit basket. The holy trinity of English education.

  15. #115
    Cute Frankenstein genkispirit's Avatar
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    Default Re: Stuff to bring

    My small town lives off tourism as it has some really nice beaches. There is A LOT of that kind of novelty trinket stuff everywhere. Even chain store owners carry the standard post cards and fridge magnets.
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