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Thread: Don't let "shi" excite you.

  1. #1
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    Default Don't let "shi" excite you.

    My placement has "shi" in its name, which I thought indicated at least a fairly urban area. Turns out it was a bunch of disparate farming towns that were amalgamated into an immense sprawling pseudocity. Great.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Hawaiiantime's Avatar
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    LOL. Too true. My "city" is a collection of 8 inaka towns that incorporated into a city a few years back. Nothing city like about it!
    Pau

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    WINNING Fyrey's Avatar
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    Yeah, don't let that mislead you. Turns out my shitty town has a higher population and density than most of the cities in my ken.

  4. #4
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    heh heh I had to help re-write the welcome letter for 2 folks who'll be joining us here and it had "shi" on it so I asked if it was possible to mention the local population rather than the so called city's population of 63,000 (as we just had our merger last November) so it was a little less misleading. Unfortunately the answer was a resounding NO. With this in mind the 63,000 is actually 5 towns which are all rather spread out (my town's 9,000 the others are slightly bigger).
    So if you're coming to Wakayama check out the name of the "city" and the rest of the address before the excitement sets in......
    welcome to the inaka!

  5. #5
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    QZ, where exactly have you been placed?

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    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    haha, i knew that once Asakuchi-shi was ungoogleable that it had been gappeid.

    Turned out I was right. A little bit of perseverence with my Japanese indicated that it was once 3 towns, the biggest of which is the size of Tamworth in New South Wales.

    Charming.

    I requested the inaka and I'm happy with my placement. I dunno about the 'land of sunshine' though.

  7. #7
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    Everyone has been griping on about " inaka " in bigdaikon, making it seem like the hell hole. I think that rural or semi-rural places are actually very good places. My professor told me ( Japanese studies ) suggested that the cities are very ugly and expensive to live in. In fact, the cities are good for weekend get away trips to sightsee, but ultimately, if you want to truly experience Japan, the semi-rural areas and rural areas are the places to be. I asked him why and he stated :

    - In inaka, you can seriously save good money. The rent is good and most of the times, the places are decent in terms of size and location. Most of the places are right beside the BOE or schools.

    - Most of the towns and villages are not so remote - transportation system is not as bad as they sound.

    - Most people who are dead set on Osaka, Kyoto or anywhere near Tokyo have to understand that experiencing Japan is not just restricted to those cities alone. You really get to work harder in internalizing yourself in the inaka, bc of stronger language barriers etc.

    - There is so much to do in the inaka area - hiking, swimming, traveling, meeting new people, camping. In fact, the JET groups in inaka areas are closer in terms of getting together, establishing strong friendships. Most inaka areas have a strong AJET group in them that provide get-togethers, activities, trips etc.

    - People are only mostly negative about inakas simply bc they are going to places that are at first "unfamiliar ", but most JETs actually ended up loving their placements. Many have stayed around for their 2nd and 3rd years.

    - It's always good to challenge yourself : Think about it as an interesting challenge - you will be doing a job that you have little or no experience in, in a rural setting and learning to live completely different from what you are used to in N. America or Europe. I think that in itself is very fascinating - you will always be busy and learning new things. You will definitely surprise yourself in your ability to live and actually enjoy living a completely different lifestyle...bc after all, isn't that what traveling and internalizing is all about?

    - Just bc it's " inaka ", it doesn't mean that you are cut off from the urban places that are usually a couple of hrs away. Also, other places that have " shi " in them ( " cities " ) may not be what you would normally consider an " urban setting ".

  8. #8
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    Same here! Mine is listed as -machi (Aizumisato-machi in Fukushima-ken), but with a little Googling I found out that it was amalgamated from 4 towns only last October, and it's still only 25k people!

    It looks like it's a stone's throw away from the largest town in the Aizu area of Fukushima though, which has 130+k people and a major university and whatnot, and public transportation to Fukushima City I'm sure, so it sounds like it'll be pretty nice. The size of my town hasn't really scared me yet.

    Any ITILers who are over there now in towns that kind of formed from smaller ones? I am really curious about the dynamics of my place, like if people resent the change, or accept it, etc.

    Sean

  9. #9

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    Well my town of 800 people amalgamated into a city of 30,000 aprox in April 2005. This seems to have happened across the board - most towns seem to have merged with other ones. (I think that the central government said if you don't merger we'll cut your budget).

    The process is still kind of going on - not everything changed at once. For example in the city next to mine the JET placements are changing (who goes to what schools etc) as the JETs change, rather than changing them all in one go. I know that locally the school lunch centre will change soon. (Not that I eat school lunch anyway)

    As for resenting it or accepting it - it just is, there's not much people can do. A lot of the local government staff have either retired or moved to the new central office. Most of them seemed more worried about keeping their jobs than about anything else.

  10. #10
    Senior Member nicklar's Avatar
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    I'm a big city boy but was survived nicely in the back blocks of Niigata inaka. Some hassles - like having to travel for a social life. But I had a great big apartment with sea views on one side and mountains on the other. I could go snowboarding, mountainbiking, etc. after school if I wanted to. I'd never would've had that in a big metropolis. One of my successors only lasted a month so not everyone likes it.

  11. #11
    WINNING Fyrey's Avatar
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    Nick - I take it you are the Nick?

    http://www.ithinkimlost.com/modules....ewtopic&t=3581

  12. #12
    Senior Member nicklar's Avatar
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    Yes, 'tis I Fyrey. I should log on more often. ops: Wow, a whole thread. Feel the love...

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