Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Teaching Elementary School

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    United States - Placed Saijo
    Posts
    124

    Default Teaching Elementary School

    I got the details of my placement from my pred... the thing is, half of my teaching (possibly more) is elementary school. This kinda has me freaked out. For the lessons, the JTE won't know any english and it will basically be all my duty to do the teaching. (And I have no experience with teaching besides Math tutoring) Does anyone know any good references for working as a elementary teacher besides Genki English? The only thing more intimidating than going to your first lesson is going to it when your the only person that knows english. I just hope I don't get punched in the nuts too many times the first lesson...

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    hometown: Perth, Western Australia - Was a JET in Yabu-shi, Hyogo-ken for 5 years, now in Taiwan
    Posts
    333

    Default Re: Teaching Elementary School

    Quote Originally Posted by Rustweaver
    I got the details of my placement from my pred... the thing is, half of my teaching (possibly more) is elementary school. This kinda has me freaked out. For the lessons, the JTE won't know any english and it will basically be all my duty to do the teaching. (And I have no experience with teaching besides Math tutoring) Does anyone know any good references for working as a elementary teacher besides Genki English? The only thing more intimidating than going to your first lesson is going to it when your the only person that knows english. I just hope I don't get punched in the nuts too many times the first lesson...
    hmm.. I think I posted a few useful links in the weblink part of this site..

    otherwise check out ESLCafe... www.eslcafe.com I think?... or just google for "esl lesson plans" you'll find heaps... plus check the JET websites.. (like the HyogoJET website.. it has heaps of stuff there)

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    United States - Placed Saijo
    Posts
    124

    Default

    Thanks! Now hopefully some of the lesson plans work with the kiddies :?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    hometown: Perth, Western Australia - Was a JET in Yabu-shi, Hyogo-ken for 5 years, now in Taiwan
    Posts
    333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rustweaver
    Thanks! Now hopefully some of the lesson plans work with the kiddies :?
    I think they even have lesson plans targets AT little kiddies.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    5

    Default

    I unfortunetly don't have any useful links, but I'm in much the same situation. Pretty much all the schools I will teach at are elementary schools where my pred told me none of the teachers really speak english (some have a few conversation abilities)

    I've been told it's all about the games, and if you can get them to sing that's even better.

    Prepare to be constantly genki

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom (England)
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Elementary School visits aren't too bad. Yeah, the JTEs at the school won't know much English, so probably they'll either give you pre-made lessons. Or you have to make them yourselves.

    Most people use http://www.genkienglish.com a site made for Elementary School teachings made by an ex-JET. They have lots of things on the site, lesson plans, flashcards and games. It's always been a life saver for me.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom (England)
    Posts
    29

    Default EEek!

    I've been placed in an elementary school. how does it work? do we have one class we teach? or do we move around the school teaching english to different classes?

    I have no idea what a lesson plan consists of, think it will be a very steep learning curve! but I've heard it can be cool teaching them, and maybe it's a better opportunity of picking up the language since hardly anyone will speak english??

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ithaca, NY/Ventura, CA (USA)
    Posts
    10

    Default elementary school teaching

    just wanted to say thanks to those who've posted weblinks on this topic... i too will be teaching in two elementary schools and although i have afterschool program experience here in the U.S., i've never been in front of a formal classroom of students that age. i look forward to having five-year-olds jeering at my Japanese!

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    United Kingdom (England)
    Posts
    26

    Default

    ok for me, I teach each class in elementary school once a month. So it does involve me running around the school into different classes. Forget about teaching grammar or stuff, anything beyond simple sentences will have the kids crying out of confusion. Vocabulary and stuff like "what is your name?" are more in order. That and a lot of games!!! Every lesson has at least one game. A definite must to fill the time up and keep your students sane.

    Your Japanese may or may not improve. The students tend to use simpler grammar and easy vocab, but so far it hasnt worked for me.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    13

    Default

    I teach in 13 elementary schools and really enjoy it most of the time. It's true, english-speaking teachers there are few and far between, but every once in a while, someone will surprise you.

    There are a lot of challenges in teaching at elementary schools. Aside from 1 session at the Tokyo orientation and a so-so book from CLAIR, there was no guidance or support when I first got here - it was all directed towards jr and sr high teaching. There's also no set curriculum to go by and every school I go to and every teacher I work with seems to have a different concept of what I'm there to do and of how much they believe the kids can actually learn (it's amazing how many of them don't think kids can learn English at that age).

    Some of my schools are really focused on the internationalization aspect of our job and have me talk about where I'm from (try to get your hands on old calendars with photos from all over your country) or even just have me play with the kids (if I had 5 yen for every game of dodgeball I've played...) I've done stuff like going orange picking and sweet potato digging and hiking and clam digging and oh yeah, sometimes I even teach English! Kidding, I teach more often than not.

    Because there aren't a lot of English-speakers at Elementary school, there aren't a lot of people that know what the kids should be working on. While I plan and teach every lesson I do at elementary schools, my say in what I teach is different at every school. Some schools make specific requests on their faxes (i.e. numbers or "animals and their noises"), others just leave it up to me to decide, which I prefer. Sometimes they make requests for things that I just choose to ignore (today, for example, I had a request for "Children's songs i.e. 10 Little Indian Boys" uuhhh... no!

    I teach classes of anywhere from 2 kids to over 70. Sometimes I teach each grade separately, sometimes 2 or 3 grades together, sometimes the whole school at one time. Most of the time, the teacher is in the class with me (although not always). Sometimes they are really involved in the lesson and help with explanations and demonstrations, sometimes they just do a bit of crowd control, sometimes they sit and sleep in the back (no joke!).

    As far as resources go, I've used a fair number of the games from www.genkienglish.com although I'm not a fan of most of their songs. There is a book listed on their website, though, that is really good - especially if you're going to be in elementary schools a lot. It's called Teachers & Kids by Joel Bacha http://genkienglish.net/joelsbook.htm It actually has a curriculum divided by grade and laid out in a monthly timeline. Obviously, I tweak it to suit my needs, but I've found it helpful. I also use www.edochan.com/teaching www.eslcafe.com (the idea cookbook) and many other websites.

    You can get by in elementary schools without Japanese. Just keep your explanations simple, use lots of gestures, draw pictures on the board and explain activities by doing them (demonstrate with the teacher or with other kids). The nice thing about the Genki site is that they have game explanations in Japanese as well, so you can just print them out and give them to the teacher. Don't just let them explain it all in Japanese though.

    According to what I've been told our basic role in elementary school is to make the kids think English is fun and not an impossible language to learn. Focus on key phrases and vocabulary instead of grammar (i.e. how are you? do you like....? do you have...? etc.) Keep things moving, make the kids get out of their seats, throw in some sort of activity involving a "jan ken" game (rock, paper, scissors) and you'll be a hit!

    Sorry this got so long! Hope it's at least a little helpful.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •