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Thread: Halloween lessons

  1. #41
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    I think I'm going to use that "I'm going to be a witch" thing with the 2nensei optional English class, but I'm changing it to "I want to be a witch" because they were studying that grammar point recently.

  2. #42
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    We're going to watch the Charlie Brown Halloween special. Yay!

  3. #43
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    The CIR in my town was planning a full on Halloween party. His workload increased significantly due to real CIR work and now I've been landed with doing a lot of the work.

    Argh

    So, does anyone know good games for a large group of kids?
    I know all the classics but I'd like to get everyone together for some.

    Or any ideas at all?
    Or websites?

  4. #44
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    Hey, Sheepy--

    I had a mini-Halloween party last year for my elementary school. One of the easiest activities you could do (meaning no preparation on your part whatsoever) is to have a spider race. The kids have to race across the gym (or wherever the event is) in a relay race on all fours. Put the kids in teams, then split the teams in half with half a team at each end of the room. The goal is to have everyone on your team get to the opposite side from where they began.

    I wanted to do bowling with plastic pumpkin heads/something orange and circular, but that didn't work out. So we just bowled with the school's makeshift bowling pins and plastic balls.

    And there's the always great Pin the Face on the Pumpkin. Your hapless victims are blindfolded and forced to reconstruct a jack o' lantern's face from memory. You can make (or commission someone bored to make) faceless pumpkins out of orange construction paper (the bigger the better), then cut out eyes and mouths out of black paper. The tricky part is figuring out how to keep the pumpkin part from ripping if you're playing the game more than once. Try to laminate the face parts and stick tape on the back of them. The pumpkin sheet will probably be too big to fit through a laminator, so you can just go over it with clear tape or secure it in a clear plastic bag.

    ...And that's about all I did. It took a little less than a hour for my fifty-five little participants, I think. Everyone didn't do the Pin the Face on the Pumpkin bit, though.

  5. #45
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    It seems a lot of the suggestions so far are for elementary schools and SHS? While I can probably adapt some of these, does anyone have any ideas for JHS?

  6. #46
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    Heyo! I'm still getting the hang of this JET business (first year) but this is what I tried out for my very first Halloween lesson, and it seemed to work well, plus the students had lots of fun and the JTEs got a real kick out of it participating in it as well.

    If you like, dress up in a simple costume (like a vampire, witch, or a mask will do) then ask kids what you are and say that you're going to celebrate Halloween - costumes, trick or treating, everything.

    I had to do a bit of preparation though, so I made flashcards of popular Halloween characters/images/costumes like a witch, werewolf, vampire, ghost, bat, pumpkin, black cat, etc. then a few "special" vocab cards, like haunted house, jack o' lantern, trick or treat, and "Happy Halloween" that are used for later.

    Run the costume/character cards with the kids first, then ask them what costume they would like to wear for Halloween (i.e. What do you want to be for Halloween? depending on the level of your students and what they're studying) Then give them the flash card of that costume.

    Before the class, I made a door out of cardboard that actually opens and decorated it with little Halloween drawings of pumpkins and bats and whatever, then we did a role play of what trick-or-treating was like.

    So, it went something like this.. first I taught the kids that they had to "knock" on the door (had them knock on their desks) then yell out loud "trick or treat" (hold up that special flash card that says this). Open the cardboard door, and then say something like, "Oh! Wow, what a nice costume! / I like your costume! What is your costume? / What are you dressed as? etc." while they can reply something like "I'm a [werewolf/witch/bat] etc. or more advanced "I'm dressed as a [____]."

    After that, if you have candy or other treats, stick your hand through the door and give them your candy, remember to say "thank you" and then finish off with the special card of "Happy Halloween!"

    So it'd look something like this..

    Student: ["knocks" on the door] Trick or treat!
    ALT: Wow! What a [scary/nice] costume! What is your costume?/What are you dressed as?
    Student: I'm a [witch/bat/pumpkin/etc.]! I'm dressed as a [___]!
    ALT: How nice! Please have some candy [hand candy through the door], and have a Happy Halloween!
    Student: Thank you! Happy Halloween!

    As I made my cardboard door open, I'd make screeching noises like it was a haunted house. The kids really got a kick out of it, and the JTEs too had a blast experiencing "trick or treating."

    I still had some time afterward, and I didn't know what to do - so I just thought of some things from some research I did earlier, like putting the costume flash cards in order in what they thought was the most popular costume in the US, or if they made a jack o' lantern, which character or phrase or word would they carve on it, or if they had a haunted house what characters would they want in each room, etc. just questions to keep the vocabulary in there.

    All in all, it was a fun Halloween! I'm also using The Nightmare Before Christmas with another school, with the same flash cards, but having students see which Halloween characters they see and put them in order. And doing role play with the flash card "costumes" asking each other what they will be for Halloween.

    Fun lesson, especially when candy is to be had!

  7. #47
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    For mine, I made Halloween Bingo (my teacher has the kids play it very class with their vocab words) where there are 6-7 words by each letter and they fill in the Bingo grid. I also made a Vocabulary sheet that used color clip art to give the meaning of each word (except scary, October and Halloween - I used kanji for scary and October and wrote in English "A holiday on October 31st" for Halloween). We went over each word that they didn't know and then they filled out the Bingo sheets and we played Bingo. I gave the winners shiny Halloween stickers and then gave a short 10 minute speech (different ones for the Jr high ichinensei and sannensei) and showed some pictures. Then, I gave them a quiz (MC for the little ones and fill in the blank for the older ones) and we went over the answers then I let them ask questions.

    Basically, this is a lesson that's meant to take up only part of the period cause the kids have to get through their textbooks.

  8. #48
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    This lesson involves a lot of preparation, but it was *REALLY* successful with one of my worst classes. Low-level non-academic high school students.

    It involves 3 activities and works best with a smallish class, though you could adapt it to a bigger one.

    Preparation: You need the two worksheets from eslprintables.com (i.e. give me your email address). Plus, and this is the biggie: Make two BIG pumpkins out of orange cardboard and stick them on the board/wall. Then make a variety of eyes, noses, mouths, etc out of black cardboard, and put an adhesive on the back (I stuck the pumpkins on a whiteboard, so stuck magent strips on the back). All this took me about 2 hours yesterday.

    Activity One: A Halloween message in code. Using a number code, get the students to decipher a simple Halloween message like "Happy Halloween! Have fun/ Trick or Treat!" or whatever. (worksheet 1) Once the WHOLE group has deciphered it, check they're correct and let them run to do activity 2.

    Activity Two: Make sure they know the words "up, down, left, right, turn, stop". One student is blindfolded and has the arrange the face pieces on the pumpkins, using directions from the other students. If you have a small enough class, make it so that they have to come up with as many different faces as there are people in the group, so everyone gets a turn. Mine worked well with 2 groups of 6 students.

    Once they've completed the set number of faces, that group is the winner. Once all the groups were finished (I made the losing group finish all 6 faces too), I made them yell out the message from the first activity, then yell "trick or treat!". Had to do this a couple of times to get them genki. (i.e. "If you don't shout, no candy!!") Gave them all sweets, with the winning group getting more than the losing group.

    This all took me about 25 minutes.

    Then, Activity 3: Get them to do the second worksheet (if you don't like mine, this can be any crossword or word search or whatever). Doesn't matter if they don't get all the answers, but the ones who get the most right (and spelt correctly) get the most candy.

    This takes up the rest of the class. About 7 minutes before the end, check their answers and dish out the sweets, then give them the correct answers.

    Phew!! Hope it works for you!
    fucking genki

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