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Thread: Grammar [parts of speech] question

  1. #1
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    Default Grammar (parts of speech) question

    I keep second guessing myself so I want to hear from some others.

    "That is the boy we met yesterday."

    What part of speech is "that', "boy", and "we"?

    Thanks in advance.

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    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grammar (parts of speech) question

    Quote Originally Posted by Sai1
    I keep second guessing myself so I want to hear from some others.

    "That is the boy we met yesterday."

    What part of speech is "that', "boy", and "we"?

    Thanks in advance.
    That - could be either a pronoun or a demonstrative adjective depending on context.

    Boy - common noun

    We - Personal pronoun.

    Enjoy.

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    Actually, I wanted to know which is the subject, which is the direct object/ indirect object, objective compliment, etc.

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    We would be the subject
    Boy would be the direct object
    You got the BFG 9000...Oh yes!!

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    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sai1
    Actually, I wanted to know which is the subject, which is the direct object/ indirect object, objective compliment, etc.
    What are they teaching you in the american education system?!

    Oh that's right. Chomskyism.

  6. #6
    az
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    Hey, you got yourself a sentence with a relative clause there.

    "That" is the subject.

    "is the boy" is the predicate.

    "[who(m)] we met yesterday" is a relative clause modifying the predicate.

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    OPPORTUNITYISNOWHERE mteacher80's Avatar
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    Ive got another question.....

    What is the plural of bus.....

    I was taught and have always thought it was busses, but just recently found out that was an American English spelling....and that buses is also correct...

    I thought if a word ended in 's' you doubled it and added 'es'
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    Quote Originally Posted by markteacher80
    Ive got another question.....

    What is the plural of bus.....

    I was taught and have always thought it was busses, but just recently found out that was an American English spelling....and that buses is also correct...

    I thought if a word ended in 's' you doubled it and added 'es'
    I always spelled it buses here in the Great White North.

  9. #9
    az
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    "Buses" and "busses" are both correct, but "buses" is preferable because "buss" is also a noun.

    I'm not sure about that doubling rule though...

    gas - gases, not gasses

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    OPPORTUNITYISNOWHERE mteacher80's Avatar
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    gasses is also correct, and that is how i spell it and it is in the dictionary as an american spelling......

    Main Entry: 1gas
    Pronunciation: 'gas
    Function: noun
    Inflected Form: plural gas·es also gas·ses
    1 : a fluid (as air) that has neither independent shape nor volume but tends to expand indefinitely
    2 : a gaseous product of digestion; also : discomfort from this
    3 : a gas or gaseous mixture used to produce anesthesia
    4 : a substance that can be used to produce a poisonous, asphyxiating, or irritant atmosphere


    This was just new to me....no big deal
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  11. #11
    az
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    Ok but I don't think th doubling rule is correct,

    here is more

    atlas - atlases, not atlasses

    circus - circuses, not circusses

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    the only steadfast rule in the English language is: except for exceptions.

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    OPPORTUNITYISNOWHERE mteacher80's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andreyla
    the only steadfast rule in the English language is: except for exceptions.
    I agree with this !!!! and the doubling thing...yeah i guess its wrong...



    mark!
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  14. #14
    az
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    Quote Originally Posted by andreyla
    the only steadfast rule in the English language is: except for exceptions.
    I'd say this applies to every single language.

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    Quote Originally Posted by az
    Hey, you got yourself a sentence with a relative clause there.

    "That" is the subject.

    "is the boy" is the predicate.

    "[who(m)] we met yesterday" is a relative clause modifying the predicate.

    Yeah I had a feeling "That" is the subject rather than "we" because the main part of the sentence is "That is the boy". "we met yesterday" is just a clause added on and isn't really required in the sentence. What about "we"? Is there something that you can classify "we" as instead of lumping it together with "met yesterday" as a relative clause? "Boy" is the subjective compliment right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dombay
    Quote Originally Posted by Sai1
    Actually, I wanted to know which is the subject, which is the direct object/ indirect object, objective compliment, etc.
    What are they teaching you in the american education system?!

    Oh that's right. Chomskyism.
    That might have been more effective/convincing if you had supplied an answer to the question as well. :wink:

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    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    Maybe.

    I thought I made my point quite clearly though.

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    Sure, the point was as clear as day. But you also left the impression that you didn't know the answer either which would label you as a hypocrite.

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    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    I studied grammar at university.

    I gave you the answer to the question you asked.

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    Well, having studied grammar in college I'd say you should know. I was a bio major so it's been quite a while for me. (since it's your field, I'll trust whatever anwers you might have to the questions I posed to Az by the way)

    But everyone knows what a common noun, pronoun, and adjective are (I'm finding out a lot of the Japanese don't). What I really wanted to know is a bit more challenging. In any case I apologize on behalf of my country for not being 100% sure that "That" was the subject. But in my defense, the only reason I second guessed myself is because according to text book the sentence came from, "we" is the subject.

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