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    Default foniks

    hey does anyone have any tips for how to teach phonics to ichinensei in jhs?
    ive decided to give it a try with my new little ones as i really think it may help. i just wondered if anyone who uses it already has any activities, worksheets, games or just handy tips to pass on
    thanks
    ally

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    you should get a copy of AJET's Foxy Phonics. i have it and it's much too easy for my academic SHS but i'm sure it would be perfect for ichinensei JHS. it's full of worksheets.

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    Yes, I've done phonics work but find that the teachers want to get through the alphabet way to quickly for the students to get the hang of it... however, if you have the same class reguarly I recommend doing some phonics work at the beginning of each lesson.

    There are some games such as phonics dominoes. You need to make a load of dominoes with consonants and consonant vowel combinations.

    eg. one half of the domino has the letters T and the other half has AT. As you put the dominoes down you must match up the Consonant to the Vowel Consonant to make a CVC word... such as "CAT". You can even tell them they can make up a word that are not real English as long as they can sound them out! But encourage them to make real words.

    (You can make it more avanced later on by adding consonant blends such as th, sh, ch etc... and then change to word ending more complicated such as ould, ood, ate, ite etc....)

    I know another game I used to play with 5 year olds called FULL CIRCLE. You start of with a simple word E.g. CAT and the first student has to change one letter in it to make a new word. eg. CAP. the next student must then do the same. eg. TAP. until you go around the whole circle. If the original word is made the student should shout FULL CIRCLE!

    This game encourages the student to use English pronunction and real letter sounds instead of just the letter name that they are taught.

    There are many other activites... but this post will get too long!
    Over-optimism modest chocolate and a soft marshmallow lead you in elegant tea time.

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    It really depends on your JTEs but if they are open to you spending some time on it you could try and devise unique symbols for each phonetic pattern, or just use the official IPA symbols. Couple that with an example picture/ word for each symbol (preferably a picture that looks like the symbol). Then when writing new words up that are irregular you can then go back to your already established symbols.

    With a solid foundation to work with you won't have to keep on going over pronounciation again and again. Well, you probably will, but at least you'll have a convenient frame of reference with memory based triggers.

    And always remember when teaching kids that age, your language is the weird one, not theirs. An understanding of Japanese phonology and phonetics really can help.

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    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    In the early stages:

    Engage the students with a fun game (fun for them for some reason, tedious as hell for you) with cards. Just put some pictures and words on cards and put them in their spewshoku table groups. You call out a word, kids grab it and the person with the most cards wins and gets a sticker. Its boring as bat shit but the kids love it for some reason. The trick is that you sound out the letters or phonemes for them so you go b b b banana or whatever in order to get them used to the sounds. The kids will look for the words starting with the sounds.

    Make it difficult for them by having lots of B V C X etc words for them but make sure you review them quickly before playing in case they don't know them. The kids will fight over them if they're anything like mine. This is hillariously entertaining.

    Also in the early stages you might want to play a game that worked well for me using the difficult phonemes for Jap speakers. So like B. Show them a diagram demonstrating the position of oratory organs etc and get them to practice difficult sounds like V. All the kids stand up and make the sound as long as they can, when they run out of breath they sit down and the last person standing gets a sticker or something.

    Possibilities are endless with cards with consonant blends on them too, hide cards round the room, get them to organise phoneme cards into a word at their lunch group desks, all sorts of stuff involving cards.

    Another game that is excruciatingly stupid but kids like it for some reason is that stupid chain words game. Make the class into teams by rows and give each row a starter word. They make a word that contains the last phoneme or phoneme group of the word before them. So if they have Church they could make Chat and then the next kid could make Teacher etc. If you emphasise that it's a race and offer the winners a sticker, a foreign coin, a 33 cent stuffed koala the kids will go bananas for it. Or at least mine do. They only get a point for their team if they spell the word correctly AND can say it. This will only work if they know some English words but i reckon if you just let them open the textbook a lot of them could probably do it.

    Ah, these games are often painful but effective. There is a time when you have to take the bull by the horns and just teach using examples and explanations like with silent E or whatever but you know, they have to learn that English is hard work sometimes too.

    Good luck.

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    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saben
    It really depends on your JTEs but if they are open to you spending some time on it you could try and devise unique symbols for each phonetic pattern, or just use the official IPA symbols. Couple that with an example picture/ word for each symbol (preferably a picture that looks like the symbol). Then when writing new words up that are irregular you can then go back to your already established symbols.

    With a solid foundation to work with you won't have to keep on going over pronounciation again and again. Well, you probably will, but at least you'll have a convenient frame of reference with memory based triggers.

    And always remember when teaching kids that age, your language is the weird one, not theirs. An understanding of Japanese phonology and phonetics really can help.
    IPA symbols are far too complicated for these kids i reckon. I had a lecturer at uni who gave the kids a personalised IPA table based on what htey had trouble with but this is far too much effort in my opinion for too little results.

    At first, its more important to demonstrate to them and hve them demonstrate to you or to each other their understand of singular phonemes, so も is not mo but m+o and poke them with a cow prod or something if they ever write katakana over their english.

    The kids will probably tell you at this point how difficult that is because some english letters have more than one pronunciation. This is when you write the kanji 日 on the board and ask them how many ways that can be said, compared to g which has 2 and is one of them more difficult ones.

    It should empower some students and this is important because Japanese people are often convinced (it would seem) that any language other than Japanese is impossible for them to learn because of their genes and other silly reasons.

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    I was a smartarse in grade 7, I hated kiddy games and always liked to know the theory behind what we were being taught and that probably shows

    As for IPA, well, I'd counter with "it's not as difficult as hiragana". The school I used to teach didn't use IPA but rather used flash cards with "ou mouse", "ow cow", etc to show that the same sounds can be written different ways. But that was primary level. I'd expect a little more from JHS.

    But then again, phonics in general is a lost cause with the Japanese.

    Except for one of my currently Japanese tutors- she's a phonetics/ phonology major. I swear she sounds Aussie, despite only having lived here 5-ish years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Saben
    Except for one of my currently Japanese tutors- she's a phonetics/ phonology major. I swear she sounds Aussie, despite only having lived here 5-ish years.
    One of my eikaiwa students went to Jamaica for two years and came back with a Jamaican accent. It's awesome.

    What about that game where they slap each other? That's good for teaching the difference between two similar sounds, like B and V. You get them to pair up, and one student is A and the other is B. The students put their hands so that the tips of their fingers are touching their partner's. Then you tell the A students to listen for "b" sounds and the B students to listen for "v" sounds, or whatever. Then you say words starting with those letters, and the student whose letter it is tries to slap their partner's fingers.

    For example:

    ALT: Book
    A students: *try to slap their partner's fingers*
    B students: *try to pull their fingers away before they get slapped*

    They seem to like that one...

  9. #9
    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saben
    I was a smartarse in grade 7, I hated kiddy games and always liked to know the theory behind what we were being taught and that probably shows

    As for IPA, well, I'd counter with "it's not as difficult as hiragana". The school I used to teach didn't use IPA but rather used flash cards with "ou mouse", "ow cow", etc to show that the same sounds can be written different ways. But that was primary level. I'd expect a little more from JHS.

    But then again, phonics in general is a lost cause with the Japanese.

    Except for one of my currently Japanese tutors- she's a phonetics/ phonology major. I swear she sounds Aussie, despite only having lived here 5-ish years.
    Japanese kids are really juvenile, more so than we were in year 7.

    If you don't play games with them they will play games by themselves instead of listening to you.

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    OPPORTUNITYISNOWHERE mteacher80's Avatar
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    I was reading this book, and I found a good 9 step method in it.

    http://www.longmanjapan.com/search/o...log.html?id=54

    NOTE: to keep it simple, just teach the main sound for each letter first.
    otherwise it gets too complicated. the other sounds for other letters
    can come later.

    1. learn the vowel sounds.
    2. learn the consonant sounds.
    3. learn vowel-consonant (for example: at, et, it, ot, ut),
    and consonant-vowel (te, ta, ti, to, tu)
    4. learn consonant-vowel-consonant (sit, sat, sot...)

    the book above had a cool idea for easily combining this.
    go to a 100yen shop and get a ringbound sketch book.
    take a craft knife a cut the inside pages in thirds. make the
    cuts at 90degrees to the spiral ring.

    write only the 5 vowels in the centre third.
    in the third on the left and the third on the right, write all the
    consonants in order from B-Z in big thick letters that are easy to see.

    now you have a book. if you are doing step 1, then only have the
    centre third visible to the students. step 2, only the left or right third visible.
    step 3, the left third and the centre third....

    the book says that you shouldnt worry at all about getting the kids to read
    consonant-vowel-consonant combos that make no sense. for example
    h-u-p d-u-t etc. this is because this exercise isnt for teaching vocab
    or spelling, its about breaking down the hard process of learning to read
    into something that builds confidence. if the kids can successfully read
    these small letter combos, then they will have confidence to read words,
    and be able to sound out the letters of the word as they read it.

    plus, some of the nonsense word combos do actually appear in actual words.
    s-e-n appears in "nonsense".

    the later steps deal with blends (ch, sh, ph etc) and longer combos, but I stopped at the 4th step.

    activities for learning the sounds that go with the letters:
    -flipping the pages of the flipbook and rote memorizing the sound to the letter.
    which is fun, and not boring if you do this for small amounts of time, frequently.
    -writing a letter on the board, then say the sound. get the students to speak
    up and say words they know that start with this letter. A= ant, apple, answer...
    -in groups of 4, have a group of letter cards, about 10, face up on a desk.
    you say a word, "green", the kids listen carefully and touch the G card.

    Another thing, there was a guy called West (1953). he made something called the GSL. (general service list). he read and analysed heaps and heaps of texts from heaps
    of different fields and sources. He made a set of 2,000 words that he thought
    to be of the greatest "general service" to learners of English. They are not the most common 2,000 words, though frequency was one of the factors taken into account in making the selection. Each of the 2,000 words is a headword representing a word family.

    getting the kids to learn 2000 words is an impossible task though in most schools eh.

    BUT, some other guys, Carroll, Davies and Richman (1971) did a study:

    number of words known % text coverage
    86741 100
    43831 99
    12448 95
    5000 89.4
    4000 87.6
    3000 85.2
    2000 81.3
    1000 74.1
    100 49
    10 23.7

    so, if you get the kids to be able to read 10 english words simply
    through rote recognition, then they can read 23.7% of stuff they
    will find in everyday english material. if they can recognise and read
    100 words, then they can read 49% of a page of english.

    this would also build confidence with reading. and I think rote learning
    isnt such a bad thing either. we do it with japanese, using tango cho's right? "
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  11. #11
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    Whats the point in trying to teach them something that they wont be tested on?
    Great men of action never mind on occasion being ridiculous; in a sense it is part of their job.

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    This page is still being built but should be done in the near future. http://jhsenglipediaproject.com/jhs_...k_phonics.aspx

    Additionally, I haven't posted them yet, but I have 4 easy Phonics rules I teach my students that will allow them to read about 250 of the 946 JHS English words Japanese children are expected to know.

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