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Thread: After JET?

  1. #21
    OPPORTUNITYISNOWHERE mteacher80's Avatar
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    Well glad to see it may help......this is the only otherthing i came across that i would like to share....a bit dimmer than the last post but good info all the same....

    Talking about finding a job in your home country(or not japan) after JET


    Don’t exaggerate :Unless you have 1-kyu at the very least, if not a JETRO qualification or translation experience too, there’s not a lot of chance of you actually using Japanese in work. Sorry, but that’s the reality. Don’t pretend you can speak Japanese (or any other language or skill in fact) if you can’t do it. Also, the vast majority of bilingual posts go to the Japanese expat community. There are lots and lots of Japanese people who are very good at English out there (just none in Fukui, it seemed at the time).


    Be realistic: And on top of that, many Japanese employers abroad seem to take a dim view of JET, not really counting it as work it all. It’s the fresh graduate jobs we need to compete for, not the ones that ask for 3 years experience. The top tip for returning JETs is that you simply aren’t going to walk into anything other than an entry-level job unless you had previous experience before JET. And yes, this may mean a significantly lower salary too. If you had no previous experience before JET, now would be the time to sort out that internship whilst you (hopefully) still have some money left from living tax- and rent- free in Japan.


    But all is not lost: Where JETs really score highly is knowing all about Japanese culture/work environment etc etc. Many Japanese employers abroad do value Japanese experience (not just JET but Nova/Geos or anything) as ex-JETs fit in well to the Japanese corporate workplace, whether it be as a graduate trainee or a sales assistant. So, yes, even Japanese fashion shops would rather take ex-JETs than any non-Japanese-experienced candidate with years of retail experience. I know that to some extent this contradicts previous points, but the key is the junior level of the jobs. It’s not going to apply for any skilled positions I’m afraid.

    Investigate Japanese employers: Although it may be something you are already aware of, you may still be surprised at the size of Japanese investment abroad. There are probably thousands of Japanese owned companies in big cities in the UK and US London alone, not including restaurants. If you’re an ex-JET living near a Japanese company in a rural area, you’ve got it sorted. Go and introduce yourself and talk to the HR people, see if you can do some work experience or just chat.

    Japanese companies are not nirvana: A shitty job is a shitty job, no matter what nationality of company you work for. Even though you may get to work for a Japanese company and get to use (some) Japanese at work and have lots of fun Japanese colleagues who say “Kawaiiii”・a lot and like enkais and karaoke at the end of the day if it’s not something you love, the novelty wears off.

    Think about what you want ・I know this gets drummed in at everyone leaving Japan but it’s really important. A little prior planning will help you to hit the ground running when you go back. Don’t fall in to the trap of lazing around for too long and getting so broke you have to take the first job offered. Looking back, I really wish I’d taken a temp job, in an office or bar or whatever, within the first couple of weeks of getting back. I could have made a couple of grand in the time I spent getting up late and filing my Japan photos. And really, there is nothing worse in an interview than the candidate who says 'i'd like to work at anything'. You NEED to have some idea of what you would and wouldn't like to do.

    For UK people ・Sign on the dole as soon as you get back. I don’t think there are any rules about time limits any more (don’t quote me) and the government gives you money for free. Result! Even if you’re only out of work for a few days you can get some benefit. Plus, importantly, it keeps your National Insurance payments up and that will be crucial as you won’t have paid any whilst in Japan. I’m dead serious. Do it the day after you get back! I don’t know the unemployment rules for other countries but I guess it might apply too.

    If this all seems really negative, my apologies. But every week candidates come in to see us who have lived in Japan and have big ideas about their future only to be horribly let down. You need to choose a career then AFTER that look at how you can apply your Japan-related skills. For me, I’m still interested in going into HR (although I’m going off the idea!!!) and so a recruitment position is a good start at the bottom of the ladder. If I keep up Japanese and get some more experience in personnel then, and only then, will I walk into an HR job with Sumitomo or Mitsui. Boring but true
    ☆★REAL EYES REALIZE REAL LIES★☆

  2. #22
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    sign on the dole?!? hmm........

  3. #23
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    I just realized I have no effing idea what I want to do after JET.







    Thanks Mark.

  4. #24
    Senior Member EisforElissa's Avatar
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    I'm thinking of applying for a teaching position at an International School after JET. I figure the experience of living and working in another country will recommend me. I may stay in Japan...or move on to Europe or somewhere else. Anyone got any info or experiences with the International School system?

  5. #25
    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    I have a degree in religion ..... hmm ...

    So I'm thinking of trying to get a job in the public service or maybe going back to uni if any uni will accept me. Depends on what department in the public service as to which would be the better option. I want to use my language skills and I really want to keep living in Asia but I don't want to be a teacher anymore as every day at this job confirms just a little bit more ...
    Melanie: back!

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  6. #26
    VIP mintedchip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EisforElissa
    I'm thinking of applying for a teaching position at an International School after JET. I figure the experience of living and working in another country will recommend me. I may stay in Japan...or move on to Europe or somewhere else. Anyone got any info or experiences with the International School system?
    I don't know if this is very helpful, but we went through a couple of American/International Schools in our youth, and it was much better than the schooling we were getting in the States, not that our State-side schools were that bad...

    In the Netherlands, all of the professors had advanced degrees, and a good number were Ivy-Leaguers with Ph.D.s in their fields. It seems like a great job for over-qualified retired people who want to live in Europe, but maybe things have changed?

  7. #27
    Senior Member EisforElissa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mintedchip
    Quote Originally Posted by EisforElissa
    I'm thinking of applying for a teaching position at an International School after JET. I figure the experience of living and working in another country will recommend me. I may stay in Japan...or move on to Europe or somewhere else. Anyone got any info or experiences with the International School system?
    I don't know if this is very helpful, but we went through a couple of American/International Schools in our youth, and it was much better than the schooling we were getting in the States, not that our State-side schools were that bad...

    In the Netherlands, all of the professors had advanced degrees, and a good number were Ivy-Leaguers with Ph.D.s in their fields. It seems like a great job for over-qualified retired people who want to live in Europe, but maybe things have changed?
    When I was gathering up my recommendations for JET, one of the professors who wrote one of mine, my professor during abroad study, highly recommended I applied for a job with international schools. She taught at one in Ghana, before she got her Masters/Ph.d. I think each school is different...I was browsing through schools in Japan and the one in Kyoto requires certification and a bit more bells a whistles while the one in Nagoya just wants experience and BAs...The International School's Services is a really good resource to see all the schools and what each requires. I'm really considering it as a post-JET option.

  8. #28
    Billy Big Bollocks Ini's Avatar
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    work for interac for 10 years then do JET again.

  9. #29
    Senior Member newdawn's Avatar
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    More and more I am thinking about the possibilty of staying on in Japan, either with CLAIR or as a private/ other company ALT.

    The original plan was to get my Master's in Translation and Interpreting from Bath in the UK, since I already speak 3 1/2 languages not including Japanese but including English (my Italian has off days). From there I might get back into teaching at the Community College here or at Uni.

    Was also thinking of maybe being a freelance translator/interpreter and teacher. But I would have to do some investigations on the market.

    Depending on how good I get at the Japanese language I could always incorporate that into my life- be a Japanese teacher, since there are currently none on my island.

    So that's my options. Granted, I have to actually go to Japan and enjoy or endure my time there first. One can only hope it's enjoy!

  10. #30
    Billy Big Bollocks Ini's Avatar
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    do your first year as a JET first. Living as an ALT in the middle of nowhere is nothing like taking a holiday here or spending a few months studying at uni .

  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by SethArmstrong View Post
    do your first year as a JET first. Living as an ALT in the middle of nowhere is nothing like taking a holiday here or spending a few months studying at uni .
    This is the best advice I've heard all day. Don't be an idiot and give that up in advance. If you do, you deserve the unhappiness it'll bring.
    "The complex Japanese language and its writing system are inventions of the devil, designed to prevent the spread of Gospel."
    -Francis Xavier (1506-1552)

  12. #32
    Senior Member onyxori's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous View Post
    I'm a civil servant. It appears the most amount of time I can take leave from my day job is a year and three months.

    Were I to be hired for JET, I would want to stay as long as I can and perhaps even work there afterwards, meaning I would have to give up my tenure at the government.

    What should I do? I loved travelling around Japan, taking its trains, and visiting its resorts. Even more so, I appriciate the culture, people, and environment. But my job provides almost guaranteed lifetime employment, and I'm uneasy about taking any drastic action as a result.
    Are you friends with anyone in HR? Can you ask them to set up a two year position hold? I think it'll have to be filed with and handled like military leave because there was no other JET- like absence file.

    If you plan to be gone for 2-3 years or longer do you think they'll hold your position? Are you going to want it after that long?

    I'm asking for a two year position hold while I'm away. I think when I get back to the states I might like the same job but with a different agency so before I return I'll ask for a lateral move...

  13. #33

    Default Re: After JET?

    Think about the long term. Your long-term prospects in Japan are probably not that good, unless there's something atypical about you that I'm not aware of.

  14. #34
    Senior Member onyxori's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous View Post
    I would like to have the option of remaining a civil servant, but not in the department I work in now.
    Are you planning on staying in Japan much longer than a year? Say you get in and go- you have a sweaty crazy time for the first couple of months and then things settle down for a bit. Six months before you are due to return to the states why not ask for a lateral then? Have someone fax the paper to you. That way you can be held for 6 mo or longer at one job and then start a new hold at your new job.

    Do you think they'll fill your position in your absence? Where I am now we are 8 people under the minimum staff requirement- the hiring process is 9 months and evil. If I left for a year or maybe two and still wanted to return I don't think they'd have my spot filled.

  15. #35
    Senior Member onyxori's Avatar
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    mmm- gov jobs- bitches to get but oh so cushy once your in...
    *contented sigh*

    I'd say if you can take the time- take it like a birthright. Arrange for 15 months leave- don't forget to talk with budget dept over your year raise and cost of living raise for when you return! You can always call Canada and quit once you have secured yourself a post JET position in Japan.

    If you don't find what you are looking for in Japan, return to your old job that'll be waiting for you with open arms and search around for a position in another agency. You won't be any worse off than right now- and you can use your experience in Japan on your resume...

    Out of curiosity If you don't get JET what are you doing?

  16. #36
    Resident ewok wicket's Avatar
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    Default Re: After JET?

    I'm into my third year of having my position held back in Australia. Guess I'm just lucky.
    "Like anyone with a sliver of honesty in them I believe what I find I believe when I wake up each morning."
    Stephen Fry, The stars' tennis balls

  17. #37
    Senior Member onyxori's Avatar
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    Default Re: After JET?

    Lucky Duck Wicket!

    It is supposed to be a year + vacation time here but I'm worming my way into the HR lady's dark little heart trying to buy more. Even without it, I doubt they'll replace me- see above comments on how understaffed our dept is and the pain it is to get in.

    I'm in law enforcement and its pretty fun, but I think its an older person's game. A year or two with JET would be a good change of pace, and I could use the time to figure out if Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE agents) was something I really wanted to do. ICE is my favorite option after JET but it is even more of a commitment and I'm just not sure I want to grow up that fast.

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