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Thread: Genki English....

  1. #21
    WINNING Fyrey's Avatar
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    All this sing us a song business is very Hobbit like huh?

    Paper - lighten up.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chiara
    Singing after a (good) few Chu-His in a karoke place is one thing (actually forms many of my best memories from Japan last summer), but being faced with a class of young children and having to do it is quite another!
    Just bring the Chu-Hais to class, that's what I'm going to do. If anybody gives you any guff, just play the role of the confused American (Or other nationality) who thinks it's nothing more than juice. I actually had a professor who came through my work-study program that brought it to an elementary school and downed a couple. "This grape juice is fantastic!"

  3. #23
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    http://www.angelfire.com/comics/esid/020604.htm

    I have to agree with Fiona on this one :twisted:
    Mabushiii!!!

  4. #24
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    Hey, I wouldn't mind much having to sing something, but the Genki English singers are totally F***** up. There prolly not as annoying when you're not sleep deprived, but right now their acid to my ears.

    Anyway, I think elementary school will be hard anyway. Lots of stories of the kids feeling your meat stick to see if it's large. Lots of stories of the balls being punched. If that's not fun, what is? (They're mostly on BD, but I have to believe them after hearing so many)

  5. #25
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    In the U.S. we have so many shows for kids that may seem annoying to older audiences: Barney, Teletubbies, etc. There are also some that I still consider pretty cool (mostly from public tv): Sesame Street, Electric Company, etc. I guess one cannot rule out the educational value of a little drama, some corny comedy and most of all the power of music when one is trying to teach a new lesson to young audiences.

    There's a comment on this thread about the kids waking up very early, going to cram school, getting home late and doing homework until very very late... etc. That really puts things into perspective. If the students are not already overloaded, they're certainly exhausted from the whole learning thing.

    I disagree that a teacher's role should be as an entertainer but one should consider being entertaining enough to elicit participation and to build an interactive environment for the students. The sound of a classroom of students shouting their English lessons at the top of their lungs would still be music to my ears... at least they're participating in their education!

  6. #26
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    I interviewed a Japanese graduate who came to my uni for a postgraduate course. I remember asking him what his hobbies and interests were back home.

    He said, "I didn't have time for anything like that, I was studying."
    Mabushiii!!!

  7. #27
    WINNING Fyrey's Avatar
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    Dynamis,

    I suspect your postgrad man isn't a representative sample.

    Generally International postgrads tend to be fairly diligent and applied, unlike imho home postgrads who are killing time. Not that I'm making sweeping generalisations. But I am.

  8. #28
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    Rewards are good, but you have to be careful as was mentioned above.

    Winnie the Pooh is from my homecity of Winnipeg. I guess I can make a lesson revolving around that.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fyrey
    Dynamis,

    I suspect your postgrad man isn't a representative sample.

    Generally International postgrads tend to be fairly diligent and applied, unlike imho home postgrads who are killing time. Not that I'm making sweeping generalisations. But I am.
    I dont know. A lot of them go to cram school and such. I guess these could just be the ones on track for university though, but my impression was that the Japanese spend a lot of TIME studying, just using out-dated techniques (memory, theory only etc).

    Ah well, all will be revealed soon enough. Suppose id better start working on my self introduction...

    Matt
    Mabushiii!!!

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