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Thread: What's the point of the JET programme?

  1. #41
    Resident ewok wicket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powers
    5 Million yen is about right, that's about a thousand (or 2) USD more than a starting HS teacher's salary in the states.
    I don't want to start a shit fight, but why should JETs be paid more than someone who's qualified to teach? Who has additional responsibilities (eg. home room teacher, writing reports etc, parent/teacher interviews etc.)? Who doesn't have a rent subsidy or get their travel expenses paid for?
    Teachers in the USA must be paid pretty handsomely. After 10 years teaching in Australia I was on the equivalent of about 4 million yen (after tax) - beginning teachers get the equivalent of about 2.8 million yen after tax.
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  2. #42
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    I wouldn't argue with a pay raise, but what we're getting seems pretty fair. It was definitely a sweet deal back when the program started (though I'm guessing it was probably a lot harder to talk kids into spending a year in Japan back then, since it wasn't really on the pop culture map yet.) It would be nice if there were a consistent policy on subsidized housing, though. Some people get a great deal, and others get nothing. I'm paying 6 man a month for my place. I wouldn't mind moving into something a little smaller for a bit less money, though. I don't think any of the HS JETs in my prefecture are getting a subsidy. Don't know about the ES, JHS JETS though.

  3. #43
    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    mmm ... well in real terms not all JETs get paid the same. I realistically get paid more than many jets because my rent is free and my appliances and their fixing, some travel and meal allowances, etc etc are paid for me.

    BUT I live in a place where it would be incredibly hard to attract a private teacher, or a lower paid teacher to live.

    But that doesn't bother me. I love it here.

    JETs should be paid more. They uproot their lives and jump head first into the deep end of the great unknown.

    But then again I think teachers in Australia are disgustingly underpaid as well.
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  4. #44
    Racist Ojichan Powers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wicket
    I don't want to start a shit fight, but why should JETs be paid more than someone who's qualified to teach? Who has additional responsibilities (eg. home room teacher, writing reports etc, parent/teacher interviews etc.)? Who doesn't have a rent subsidy or get their travel expenses paid for?
    In my post on page 2, I was advocating 5 million yen for qualified teachers.

    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeCarter
    Drop the number of JETs down from 9000 to 1000, only put them in schools where they will be used effectively, only employ people with japanese ability and teaching qualifications, and add 2million yen(my figure, not GeorgeCarter's) to the yearly salary.

    Quote Originally Posted by Powers
    Exactly my point,
    Teachers in the USA must be paid pretty handsomely. After 10 years teaching in Australia I was on the equivalent of about 4 million yen (after tax) - beginning teachers get the equivalent of about 2.8 million yen after tax.
    5 Million Yen today works out to just over $44000 CDN. The starting salary of a teacher with a Bachelors of Education and a Bacherlors or Major of something else is around $40000 before tax, so I think that number is not so unreasonable, considering any subsidies you recieve for housing, cars etc. are not a given, but a perk of your particular BOE.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by wicket
    beginning teachers get the equivalent of about 2.8 million yen after tax.
    You have to be fucking kidding me. Whats the cost of living like? If its anymore than Indonesia's then you must be a right stupid cunt to become a teacher.
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  6. #46
    Resident ewok wicket's Avatar
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    Cost of living's lower than Britain, for sure, but still not really cheap. Salary's go up every year (dependent on an annual review) but that stops after 10 years, unless you want to go into principal class (no way!)
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  7. #47
    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    Depends where you live too. The cost of livign in Sydney is significantly higher than the cost of living in the next most expensive city, Melbourne. One thing Melbourne has on us!
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  8. #48
    Senior Member frankdux's Avatar
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    i agree with what some of you have said.

    ALTs are only a waste because they are not put to proper use. I knew going in to this not to treat it as a paid vacation, but in all honesty thats what is almost feels like. half my day is spent online reading CNN, or The Onion, or posting here. the other half is spent reading short passages aloud to the class and grading simple engrish worksheets. not really much of a job.

  9. #49
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    I don't understand where you guys get all that free time! I'm constantly busy. But then again, I don't have the option of getting online really, except to do some quick work stuff or print some stuff out I sent to myself via e-mail, so I have to find things for myself to do. I go to the other classes - like art and music. The teachers love it and it's a good time to get to know the students and be a part of the group. I also practice my Japanese, make props and lesson plans for my classes. After school I go to club activities. I always work overtime, I'm at school about as long as most of my teachers. They definitely get thier money's worth from me, plus I think my students feel like they can approach me more - which gives them more English practice. The other day two of my students came over and we just chatted for about 4 hours in Japanese and English over brownies. I'm positive that's probably the most time they'd spent using English in a long time (because my pred was a recluse) and they enjoyed it rather than despising it (evidently he also gave alot of homework). I'm also in the inaka, but I definitely love it here - and considering my JTE's levels of English, I'm definitely a necessity when it comes to pronunciation, idioms, more complex sentence structure and vocab, etc.

    As for "unskilled labor" ... I may not speak Japanese very well, but I do have quite a bit of experience teaching language to elementary, middle and college students. I've also taken multiple different language courses from various language families so I know how to approach learning and teaching them from a variety of ways. Besides, all of us at least have BA/BS s, which does mean that we've got a considerable amount of education behind us - even if it's not necessarily in Japanese, linguistics, or teaching. I do agree that in some instances JETs are overpaid and aren't necessary for thier placements... but that's dependent on both the school they're at and the ALT. You need both to have a successful situation.
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  10. #50
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    the countryside here, in japan, is the same as in any place: Only a tiny fraction of kids go on to bigger and better, the rest are stuck in the same town forever, likely doing the same jobs as their parents. No one can change that. not JETs in Japan, or legitimate public educators in USA, CAN, ENG, AUS, etc.

    At least in Japan, the public education system can bring some internationals over. Where I live in Canada, theres barely enough funds to field a complete football team roster.

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