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Thread: chikaku vs. chikai

  1. #1
    Pandilex
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    Default chikaku vs. chikai

    How come I always hear Chikaku but never almost never Chikai?

    家の近く surely that's gramatically incorrect?

    isn't 家の近い correct?

  2. #2
    Delicious...and moist! kiwimusume's Avatar
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    In this case, 近く isn't an adjective, it's a noun. It means "vicinity" or something. So no, no grammatical problems with it.
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  3. #3
    Pandilex
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    another case solved, thanks

    The adjective form of 近い is still 近く though right? so it has 2 meanings?

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    Delicious...and moist! kiwimusume's Avatar
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    Yup! Exactly.
    Quote Originally Posted by goloons View Post
    My favorite student just tried to BITE MY NIPPLE.
    Quote Originally Posted by Coollead View Post
    Yeah, it's really good stuff. For some reason, they bound it as a book, instead of on a roll. There's 190 pages, which is probably good for at least a few dozen shits.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwimusume
    Yup! Exactly.
    Uh, hmm... I have a bit of an issue with this.

    ”あの、すみませんが、駅はどちらですか?”
    ”あ!とても近いですよ。”

    "Um, excuse me, which way is the station?"
    "Ah! It's very close to here."

    In this case, the adjective form is certainly going to be the -i form. ”近くです” wouldn't work.

    A good rule of thumb in this instance is that 近く is typically coupled with the particle に, while 近い is the root form of the adjective, and is used with です or, in informal speech, as the predicate by itself. A few example sentences:

    ”私のアパートの近くにコンビがあります。” -> "There's a convenience store near my apartment."

    ”居酒屋はここから近いよ!行こうか?” -> "The izakaya's right near here! Wanna go?" (Note the informal tone; that's why 近い can be used without the copula です.)

    For a good contrast, look at these three:

    ”私のアパートはここから近いです。”
    ”俺のアパートはここから近い。”
    ”私のアパートはここの近くにあります。”

    All three of these mean "My apartment is close to here," but use three different forms of 近い. The copula is used in the formal voice, and omitted in the informal; otherwise the first two sentences are the same. The third one uses あります instead of です, so you need to link the 近 kanji to it with the に particle; thus, 近くに.

    Hope this helps! Remember, though, I'm only taking my 3Q this year, so take everything I say with a grain of salt, eh?

  6. #6
    Delicious...and moist! kiwimusume's Avatar
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    Whoops. For some reason I read Pandilex's post as "The adverb form of 近い is still 近く".

    Adjective - 近い.
    Adverb - 近く.
    Noun - 近く.

    My bad!
    Quote Originally Posted by goloons View Post
    My favorite student just tried to BITE MY NIPPLE.
    Quote Originally Posted by Coollead View Post
    Yeah, it's really good stuff. For some reason, they bound it as a book, instead of on a roll. There's 190 pages, which is probably good for at least a few dozen shits.

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    Wow, that was way more concise than mine. Thanks for clarifying, musume.

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    Resident ewok wicket's Avatar
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    I don't think 近く is the adverb (what verb is it describing?); rather I'm pretty sure it's an adjectival noun.
    Anyone?
    "Like anyone with a sliver of honesty in them I believe what I find I believe when I wake up each morning."
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    Quote Originally Posted by wicket
    I don't think 近く is the adverb (what verb is it describing?); rather I'm pretty sure it's an adjectival noun.
    Anyone?
    Adjectival nouns are another name for -na adjectives, or so says my grammar book, backed up by Wikipedia.

    You piqued my interest on this one, so I did a bit more research... it turns out that the adjectives 遠い and 近い, plus some others, exceptional in that their -ku forms can be treated as NOUNS instead of adverbs. Thus, 遠く can mean "distance", 近く can mean "proximity". So...

    ”私のアパートは駅の近くにあります。”

    In this case, "駅の近くに" is a single noun structure meaning "the station's proximity", or, more fluidly, "the area close to the station", and is a complement to the verb あります. So, this sentence literally becomes "My apartment exists in the area close to the station."

    But...

    ”危ないよ、あの変な男が近く来るよ!” -> "Look out, that wierd guy is coming closer!"

    In this case, 近く is acting like a normal adverbial form of an -i adjective.

    Now that I think about it, I've heard lots of other examples of this -ku form -> noun business. It's perfectly fine to say "遠くへ" for "into the distance", and "朝の早く" and "夜の遅く" come to mind as well. Wish I could find a comprehensive list of adjectives that act like that.

  10. #10
    Delicious...and moist! kiwimusume's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wicket
    I don't think 近く is the adverb (what verb is it describing?); rather I'm pretty sure it's an adjectival noun.
    Anyone?
    It can be an adverb AND a noun. You just tend to hear it being used as a noun more often than as an adverb.
    Quote Originally Posted by goloons View Post
    My favorite student just tried to BITE MY NIPPLE.
    Quote Originally Posted by Coollead View Post
    Yeah, it's really good stuff. For some reason, they bound it as a book, instead of on a roll. There's 190 pages, which is probably good for at least a few dozen shits.

  11. #11
    Pandilex
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    Cheers. I did actually type adverb but quickly edited my post ;p


    Thanks for the big explanation, fortunately most grammar stuff comes pretty easily to me so I already 'think' like a jap when it comes to using words.

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    I know where you're coming from, believe me... never studied Japanese formally, just picked up what I know from my year in Niigata. I do these things as much for my own knowledge as anything else.

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