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Thread: -たり と -り verb conjugation:

  1. #1
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    Default -たり と -り verb conjugation:

    As far as I can tell, "-ri" is the present tense and "-tari" is the past tense, and it is used much like the -te form to create a list of things you did (verbs), but one that isn't all-inclusive. Sort of like と and や particles.

    Assuming that's right, I never did get a rule on conjugating it (it was only mentioned in passing in class)...does it just follow the same rules as "-te"?

    Keep in mind my Japanese is fairly low level, don't get too crazy on me.
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  2. #2

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    I'm pretty sure it's conjugated just like the past tense or ~て form of any verb is - 食べる=食べたり;飲む=飲んだり;買う=買ったりetc. etc.

    As far as JUST a -り form...I've never seen that.

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    The example we were given in class included a 'fill in the blank' sort of question, which she wrote up as:


    _____ri, _____ri, ______ri. It seemed to me she was looking for verbs conjegated to the -te form but using the -ri ending, insted of the -tari ending....or I'd have though she would just write -tari.

    Anyway, what do I know....I'm just starting.
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    The -たり -たり is a type of verb conjugation to indicate that the actions in the sentence are "some" (not all) of the things that the subject did. Also, -たり -たり conjugation must end in する (or した for past form).
    Example: 昨日はすしを食べたり本を読んだりしました。
    Yesterday I ate sushi and read a book (I am listing only 2 out of the many actions I did yesterday).

    When you use -て, -て, -last verb + its present or past ending, you indicate that those actions are "everything" the subject did.

    It's like the difference between using と and や as conjunctions. They both mean "and," but the や is for giving an "incomplete" list.

    Have fun learning Japanese!

  5. #5
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    no no....I get that part.....I was asking if there is a -ri ending that would be the 'ya' version, but in present tense.
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    From what I understand, the tense is indicated by the ending verb. It's する if it's present tense and した if it's past. There's only one form of -たり, just like there's only one form of ーて.

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    tari is the equivalent of ya. te form is the equivalent of to.
    I think your teacher just wrote 'ri' on the board because she wanted you to figure out how to make the ta part yourself and to not separate it from its verb.
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    Yeah as I understand it 'ya' and 'tari' are the same.
    Except ya is used to connect multiple nouns and tari is used to connect multiple verbs. It also has a feeling there are other things you were gonna say but missed out.

    With ya you could say:-

    ball and apple and otherthings

    with tari you could say

    eating, drinking and other things.

    Of course with tari you can use nouns as well but you MUST have a verb in there since you can't get a ~ta form from a noun



    One thing I never understood was that you could use it with desu using shi,

    ですし、

    but I still don't get that variation, or even if it is the same or not as ya and tari. I'm ok with grammar that I sort of understand when it it said to me, but avoid using since I don't really get it

  9. #9
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    it is not just です that can end in し.
    し and たり mean the same thing.....

    たべるし おどるし  is just used when speaking but 食べたり おどったり can be writen or spoken....
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