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Thread: Common Mistakes in Japanese English

  1. #21
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    Itary, clazy (not being an ass, my kids are NEVER sure which is correct, and I saw a van with 'Murakami Raundry' on the side of it last night....)

    They seem to have trouble adding 'ing' to some words that need it. Also 'er' and such. Might just be that my kids never learned it though.

  2. #22
    Billy Big Bollocks Ini's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoshi
    Itary, clazy (not being an ass, my kids are NEVER sure which is correct)
    What are you teaching them that involves the words crazy and Italy so much?



    Racist!

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by EddieHitler
    Quote Originally Posted by Hoshi
    Itary, clazy (not being an ass, my kids are NEVER sure which is correct)
    What are you teaching them that involves the words crazy and Italy so much?



    Racist!
    ... and his most recent alias is EddieHitler

  4. #24
    Billy Big Bollocks Ini's Avatar
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    and?

    You are supposed to be internationalising these children yet you seem to have a glaring lack of knowledge when it comes to popular culture.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by neo_relina
    I decided "Let's go" is the only one that can really be used a lot. At least, that is what I think, which is worth little.
    Another one that is used frequently in normal conversation is "Let's take..." as in "Let's take the bus." or "Let's take the stairs." (instead of waiting for the elevator).

  6. #26
    Senior Member Rin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marrissey
    Quote Originally Posted by Narniaru
    Quote Originally Posted by Marrissey
    Gold/yellow hair.
    What do you mean by this?
    They say gold/yellow hair, not "blonde", because it's gold in Japanese.
    Do them one better: Teach them "flaxen haired" and its male equivalent, "tow haired". The origins are fairly obvious, though the reason for the use of "tow" for boys is that tow is specifically the fiber of flax, and tends to be in fairly short strands when cultivated from the flax. The flax itself is much longer, which is why the girls get the plant, whereas the boys get the fibers.
    教育を要らない
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    3 years later - it aint culture shock. Japan's just got its priorities wrong here.

  7. #27
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    The closest I've come to teaching English has been in my language exchange with a couple Japanese exchange students while in college.

    Their English was pretty good, considering the length of time they had studied it, and at any rate it was far better than my Japanese was at the time.

    However, the Achilles' Heel for both of them was the word "refrigerator". Neither one could even begin to pronounce it. Something about the combination of sounds in native English just confused them. I sounded it out for them like a loanword in Japanese - RE FU RI JI REE TAA - and they got it right away. Then I told them that everyone just calls it a "fridge" anyway, and they liked that a lot better.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rin
    Quote Originally Posted by Marrissey
    Quote Originally Posted by Narniaru
    Quote Originally Posted by Marrissey
    Gold/yellow hair.
    What do you mean by this?
    They say gold/yellow hair, not "blonde", because it's gold in Japanese.
    Do them one better: Teach them "flaxen haired" and its male equivalent, "tow haired". The origins are fairly obvious, though the reason for the use of "tow" for boys is that tow is specifically the fiber of flax, and tends to be in fairly short strands when cultivated from the flax. The flax itself is much longer, which is why the girls get the plant, whereas the boys get the fibers.
    Did you mae those words up? :wink: Ive never heard either of them before

  9. #29
    Delicious...and moist! kiwimusume's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whitehart
    Quote Originally Posted by Rin
    Quote Originally Posted by Marrissey
    Quote Originally Posted by Narniaru
    Quote Originally Posted by Marrissey
    Gold/yellow hair.
    What do you mean by this?
    They say gold/yellow hair, not "blonde", because it's gold in Japanese.
    Do them one better: Teach them "flaxen haired" and its male equivalent, "tow haired". The origins are fairly obvious, though the reason for the use of "tow" for boys is that tow is specifically the fiber of flax, and tends to be in fairly short strands when cultivated from the flax. The flax itself is much longer, which is why the girls get the plant, whereas the boys get the fibers.
    Did you mae those words up? :wink: Ive never heard either of them before
    I've heard of "flaxen" in a couple of trashy romance novels...never heard "tow", though.
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    Yeah, it's really good stuff. For some reason, they bound it as a book, instead of on a roll. There's 190 pages, which is probably good for at least a few dozen shits.

  10. #30
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    For some reason my kids constantly capitalize 'it' in the middle of a sentence. i.e. "She said It was bad." I don't get it!! Does anybody else find this in their student's writing?
    Fight like a grapefruit, aim for the eyes.

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