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Thread: Easter lesson

  1. #21
    Senior Member tedcase's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MostHolyPorcine
    It's the frigen center piece of Christianity, the death and resurrection of our lord and savior.
    Thats YOUR lord and savior, not mine.

    rAmen.
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  2. #22
    Racist Ojichan Powers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cb
    That's why it's called Christmas" and all the kids either say "ooooh" or "what's Christianity" and then I just go back to santa.
    You ignore your student's questions? :x

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by tedcase
    Quote Originally Posted by MostHolyPorcine
    It's the frigen center piece of Christianity, the death and resurrection of our lord and savior.
    Thats YOUR lord and savior, not mine.
    Yea, the gay guy who drinks too much, smokes a couple packs a day, and routinely tells people to fuck off is a hard core Christian (well, throw is some crystal meth and male whores, and I guess that would describe half the evangelical preachers in the states...)

    Dude, it was for rhetorical effect. "The death and resurrection of those who buy into Christianity's lord and savior" just doesn't have the same panache, y'know?

    So, Fuck off!

    Quote Originally Posted by tedcase
    You ignore your student's questions?
    Don't you? I refused to translate "unko" for a bunch of ichinenseis once (because, for some reason, I couldn't think of any word besides "shit" which just didn't seem appropriate). They then looked it up in a JHS dictionary which translated it as "stool". So now all the ichinensei boys will come up to me and ask "Do you eat stool? Do you like stool?"....problem is, they say it like stew, so a couple weeks after the incident, the asked me, and I said, yea, stew is delicious, especially Japanese stews. So...yea, that kinda killed me with them.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marrissey
    Quote Originally Posted by Narniaru
    The teacher says you mean no Santa? And all is well :P
    Well that's rather my point. By avoiding the Christian aspect of Christmas and teaching only about Santa you're actually re-enforcing an already apparent Japanese ignorance about the holiday. You're the ALT from another country, what you say is the be all and end all of foreign culture. That's surely the anti-cultural exchange.
    Christmas really is different, though, and santa-christmas doesn't have that much to do with Christianity. My Atheist/agnostic very-much-not-Christian family will still buy a tree and give out presents from Santa, so that's the tradition I teach about. I'll briefly mention the religious aspect of it, but the holiday is so secular now that it's not like I'm lying to them by downplaying the role of the church in the holiday.

    I just don't see how you can do the same with Easter, though.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Powers
    Quote Originally Posted by cb
    That's why it's called Christmas" and all the kids either say "ooooh" or "what's Christianity" and then I just go back to santa.
    You ignore your student's questions? :x
    yeah. no way in hell I'm saying more than that. I've explained it's a religious holiday, and what it celebrates. After that, I'm not touching that with a 10 foot pole. I'll let their parents, or the local missionaries explain that. That's like
    "The holiday is a coming of age ceremony. That means that after that, they're physically and mentally adults"
    "what does physically adult mean?"
    "Um, nothing. Who wants a sticker!?"

  6. #26
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    and yeah, I agree with porcine. It's not that I'm trying to convert them or anything, but I feel that they should understand what a holiday like that is really about. If I were asked to teach a lesson about Hanuka then I'd briefly explain the Hanuka story. Otherwise you're just feeding the kids half truths. At JHS I've got a teacher who on his own briefly explained the religious significance of Christmas, and he certainly isn't Christian. It's just making sure the kids get the whole picture.

  7. #27
    Daimyo ***** dombay's Avatar
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    Yea I taught them the nativity story last year.

    That's what Easter is all about. Not chocolate. And that chocolate is the fruit of slave child labour in Columbia anyway.
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  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by MostHolyPorcine
    Christmas really is different, though, and santa-christmas doesn't have that much to do with Christianity. My Atheist/agnostic very-much-not-Christian family will still buy a tree and give out presents from Santa, so that's the tradition I teach about. I'll briefly mention the religious aspect of it, but the holiday is so secular now that it's not like I'm lying to them by downplaying the role of the church in the holiday.

    I just don't see how you can do the same with Easter, though.
    I think you're right since Christmas is celebrated in a lot of non-Christian countries now, whereas Easter is not. Plus, at least with Santa Claus, there's a story to teach the kids. You did say you'd make brief mention of the religious aspect - I think that's all that's really needed, but it is needed.

    For example though, I would never teach Halloween or Pancake Day without trying to explain why we do it. I really don't think it's healthy for the youth of Japan to believe we have all our festivals because they look pretty and we can eat lots of candy :?

  9. #29
    Senior Member Narnia's Avatar
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    I thought Halloween was just about costumes and candy :?: We don't "celebrate" Halloween in South Africa, so all I can teach the kids is about ghosts and monsters.

    I personally don't teach about Christianity because I am not Christian. Not all foreigners are Christian but this is what my JTEs believe. They still ask me about Jesus even though I have said I don't believe in him. Its the same as baseball and American culture, I don't come from that background so I can't teach it.

    My Christmas in my house in South Africa has zippo to do with religion. We get together with our small family and have a braai and my uncle gets drunk. I can only teach about what I know. I tell them about MY South African culture. I am sorry I am not an American Christian so that I can be the perfect foreigner.

    Once again I DO NOT TEACH Easter. I have not eaten an Easter egg, or done Jesus related things since I was 13 and left primary school.
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  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Narniaru
    My Christmas in my house in South Africa has zippo to do with religion. We get together with our small family and have a braai and my uncle gets drunk. I can only teach about what I know. I tell them about MY South African culture. I am sorry I am not an American Christian so that I can be the perfect foreigner.

    Once again I DO NOT TEACH Easter. I have not eaten an Easter egg, or done Jesus related things since I was 13 and left primary school.
    Woah there! No-one's having a go at you per se Narn. I'm not a Christian either - none of my family are. That doesn't mean that when I'm teaching about a Christian festival, I don't at least mention that it exists because of a religious practice. I think as teachers it's kind of our responsibility to research the topic we're talking about. As I said, though, I don't teach about the big Christian festivals anyway - I prefer to teach them about the bizarreo ones that came from Britain (i.e Halloween & Pancake Day).

  11. #31
    Billy Big Bollocks Ini's Avatar
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    Or you could adhere to your contract and not teach anything about religion.
    Great men of action never mind on occasion being ridiculous; in a sense it is part of their job.

  12. #32
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    No politics or religion? Wow, that pretty much rules out all holidays.

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