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Thread: "Teaching Arsenal"

  1. #1
    Member zenzen's Avatar
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    Default "Teaching Arsenal"

    Hi! I've been reading this site for a while and just signed up today. I've seen a lot of information on teaching aids in this forum, but my question is sort of different. I hope I'm posting in the proper place!

    When you left for Japan, what did your teaching arsenal look like in terms of visual aids, flashcards, games, etc.? And how has it changed since you arrived?

    I have heard it can be difficult to get things like flashcards and whatnot in the country, so it's best to buy it at home or in Tokyo, but I'm not sure how to prepare as my background's not in teaching. Any insight would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Billy Big Bollocks Ini's Avatar
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    I didnt have a teaching arsenal to begin with.
    Now I have a few scraps of paper with stuff printed off google images on them.

  3. #3

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    What I brought from my home country:

    National flag (for introduction lesson)
    Map of UK (for introduction lesson - have used for others too)
    UK postage stamps (to give out in intro lesson)
    Photo files on my laptop (I inherited a colour printer, so could do that here)
    UK Stickers (for intro lesson & other times)
    Stamps (to stamp students' passports - couldn't find many good ones in the UK)

    What I've made here:

    Flashcards (just buy clear hard plastic A4 wallets from the 100 yen shop and print off or draw flashcard pictures and slip them in - you only need to spend like 1500 yen to have a set of 15 changeable flash cards).
    Play money (printed off, cut out).
    World map (bought from the 100 yen shop)
    Huge dice (bought from the 100 yen shop)
    Playing cards (bought from the 100 yen shop)
    Stamps (because my UK ones were crap and not cute/cool enough - bought loads from a shop called Loft here)
    Photos (by printing from my computer)
    Hundreds of karuta playing card sets (print off pictures, cut them out, glue them to card from the 100 yen shop)
    Restaurant Menus (bought ringbinders from, you guessed it, the 100 yen shop, and made lots of pages on the computer with photos)
    Passports (we use these to reward students, just need coloured card from you know where!)

    Basically, what you should bring:
    Your country's flag.
    A map of your country.
    (Get them off ebay or something).

    You could also bring stuff like restaurant menu leaflets in English if you have the space. Bear in mind that you'll probably need 40+ copies of things like that!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Narnia's Avatar
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    I thought we were talking about soccer

    I find that you can get pretty much anything in a 100yen store. And you can make the rest. I make all my own flashcards, worksheets, board games etc. My SA flag is so big so I mde a smaller one to stick on the board.
    Dr Peterson: 'I'm a schoolteacher'
    Porter at Empire Hotel: 'Thought so: they always look as if they've lost something' -From "Spellbound"

  5. #5
    The only good Windows KeroHazel's Avatar
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    I plan to bring some US dollars and ask the kids to compare them to other items of similar value:
    - toilet paper
    - leaves
    - hair and nail clippings

  6. #6
    ITIL's Favorite Beaner! Gusuke's Avatar
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    I've been told bringing a high school yearbook is good, since they can get an idea of what an American school is like.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Narnia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gusuke
    I've been told bringing a high school yearbook is good, since they can get an idea of what an American school is like.
    Or you could just show them "High School Musical"
    Dr Peterson: 'I'm a schoolteacher'
    Porter at Empire Hotel: 'Thought so: they always look as if they've lost something' -From "Spellbound"

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gusuke
    I've been told bringing a high school yearbook is good, since they can get an idea of what an American school is like.
    It really is. Or just a picture of your class from when you were younger - my students enjoyed trying to guess which one's me.

  9. #9

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    When I was in my second year of high school they remodeled/added on, and the district completely fucked up the job by hiring a firm who had never designed a school before (they were known for their work on casinos). So now it is quite a sight to see.. they'll probably get a kick out of seeing the disaster.

  10. #10
    Member zenzen's Avatar
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    Thanks for the information! Keep it coming!

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