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Thread: japanese study on the DS

  1. #21
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
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    Default Re: japanese study on the DS

    You did your son a big disservice by not teaching him English.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AliDimayev View Post
    You did your son a big disservice by not teaching him English.
    what's to say his son doesn't learn English later on?

    regardless of how "smart" it is to learn English in this current day and age, I dunno how you can criticize someone who values spending time with his family over trying to force feed the language to his son when he himself doesn't like the way it's taught through the system his son goes through.

    /end rant

    back to the topic of the DSi. the one thing that sorta swayed me away from buying it today at the mall (aside from the fact that the store didn't have the games I wanted) was the software-regional lock. Because the DSi OS is a software, the language is locked in Japanese? So I can't change it to English? I know that I'll be able to play DSi games sold in America (the games themselves are not locked by region) but yea, that suddenly doesn't sound too appealing.

    I know a few of you who have bought the DSi claim to be Japanese Langauge noobies, has it been a struggle to use it? Is it worth it? And if so, should I just wait to pick one up in Tokyo when I visit? Also, did you guys buy the games online or where did you find the games themselves?

  3. #23
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dayman114 View Post
    what's to say his son doesn't learn English later on?

    regardless of how "smart" it is to learn English in this current day and age, I dunno how you can criticize someone who values spending time with his family over trying to force feed the language to his son when he himself doesn't like the way it's taught through the system his son goes through.

    /end rant

    back to the topic of the DSi. the one thing that sorta swayed me away from buying it today at the mall (aside from the fact that the store didn't have the games I wanted) was the software-regional lock. Because the DSi OS is a software, the language is locked in Japanese? So I can't change it to English? I know that I'll be able to play DSi games sold in America (the games themselves are not locked by region) but yea, that suddenly doesn't sound too appealing.

    I know a few of you who have bought the DSi claim to be Japanese Langauge noobies, has it been a struggle to use it? Is it worth it? And if so, should I just wait to pick one up in Tokyo when I visit? Also, did you guys buy the games online or where did you find the games themselves?
    It's his son. All you have to do is speak english when he was a baby and he would learn. How do you think I learned Chechen even though I grew up in America?

    I have a friend whose mom is from Italy and father is from Germany. When his mom was with him (from a baby) she spoke Italian. When his father was with him (again, since he was born) he spoke German. When both parents were with him, they spoke English. So he grew up speaking three languages.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  4. #24
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
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    Default Re: japanese study on the DS

    I am talking about how he should ahve spoke Englishi to his son since the day he was born, so he could grow up learning English and japanese.

    Dy'understand?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AliDimayev View Post
    I am talking about how he should ahve spoke Englishi to his son since the day he was born, so he could grow up learning English and japanese.

    Dy'understand?
    Yea, I understand that. I also understand that kids at a very young age are more receptive to learning multiple languages than later on. I get that it's easier and in your opinion, would've been prudent for reed to have done so. But to say that he was doing his son a disservice with all the reasons he listed as to why he didn't, sounded a bit harsh.

    It's great that you learned Chechen as a youngster. I myself was taught Korean since I was 1 all the way till I was 13. I can't speak Korean for the life of me, but I can sure as hell speak Spanish quite well, which I learned through High School. Every child is different and a lot of parents (hopefully) do their best to rear that child in a way that best fits their environment/lifestyle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by reed View Post
    He is Japanese, of course!

    He's 10 years old and heading into 5th grade very soon, with increasing responsibility in all areas of study, so we don't push him on English. He'll pick it up or he won't, but I'm unsalvageably disgusted with the Japanese education system and will never, ever subject my son to the kind of language "education" that I'm forced to teach in schools, and which he has no interest in anyway. We will study it together in the USA, if he asks, and he will benefit from real-life use and exposure then, but as long as we're in Japan we speak Japanese. I suddenly sound defensive, don't I! The funny thing is that I met him and my wife when as students at my eikaiwa. And while they continued as students for a while after that, we all felt it was ridiculous, and so real learning happens in much smaller steps, in real ways, at home in private. But I'm combating six hours of school a day and as many as five hours of homework a night, in Japanese, with barely enough energy or stability to even keep the family together. English is one of the least important things these days.

    Imagine your father as an oil prospect and rig man. He comes home every day exhausted and dirty and says the business is crap, it's crap, it's so horrible, but it pays the bills. Then imagine you go to work with your dad once a week to "learn the oil biz", and discover that his job is actually mixing black ink with syrup and squirting it on the heads of other people who laugh and swallow and imagine they are making progress. Your dad is spouting ridiculous simple facts about oil, laughing with them, sort of maniacal. Not your dad at all. We felt that way as a family about me "teaching English" to them, and go to lengths to avoid it at home, which means not really doing it in a structural real way either. We're tired. We all pop in Spongebob and then a few episodes of CSI, English dialogue Japanese subtitles, and get more out of that. Then we buy cheap Walmart books aimed at English-speaking 10 year olds, stuff about spiders or snakes, educational stuff that uses simple language but doesn't treat its audiences like fools. His comprehension is always higher than I expect. I don't translate when we do this stuff. Well, okay, I do sometimes. But it's more for me.


    How did this get so long?!
    To put an end to the debate going on above me about teaching his son English at a young age, read what he actually wrote (I've bolded it for you)

    He met his wife and son at an eikaiwa; i.e., his son is--at least technically--his stepson, so there was probably no chance for him to teach the kid English as an infant/toddler, since they hadn't met yet.

    And now, for something completely different...


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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryee View Post
    To put an end to the debate going on above me about teaching his son English at a young age, read what he actually wrote (I've bolded it for you)

    He met his wife and son at an eikaiwa; i.e., his son is--at least technically--his stepson, so there was probably no chance for him to teach the kid English as an infant/toddler, since they hadn't met yet.

    And now, for something completely different...

    haha good eye ryee.

  8. #28
    Cool Cutie Fighter! Hyakuman's Avatar
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    Default Re: japanese study on the DS

    For learning kanji reading/writing, I use a game called なぞっておぼえる大人の漢字練習.

    It doesn't have the meanings, but it straight drills you from beginner kanji, right through to the last joyo kanji. The thing I like about it, is that the tests make you write pronunciation and kanji, so you learn how to actually write the kanji. It's a fairly simple game but definitely one of the best in my mind.

    It also shows you the proper stroke order, and all the associated pronunciations for the particular kanji.

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    For these DS programs are there any out there where you can customize the order you learn kanji in?

    I've been using a book called 'Kanji in Context' where they introduce kanji in their own order and I would like a DS program where I can follow the same order as the book.
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  10. #30
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    Default Re: japanese study on the DS

    I think all games teach you it like gradeschool does, starting from grade 1 and up. There's no customization available that I know of.

  11. #31
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    Default Re: japanese study on the DS

    God damn. My DS and Ipod shuffle both crapped out on me over the last two weeks.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  12. #32
    Senior Member Atalante's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dayman114 View Post

    back to the topic of the DSi. the one thing that sorta swayed me away from buying it today at the mall (aside from the fact that the store didn't have the games I wanted) was the software-regional lock. Because the DSi OS is a software, the language is locked in Japanese? So I can't change it to English? I know that I'll be able to play DSi games sold in America (the games themselves are not locked by region) but yea, that suddenly doesn't sound too appealing.

    I know a few of you who have bought the DSi claim to be Japanese Langauge noobies, has it been a struggle to use it? Is it worth it? And if so, should I just wait to pick one up in Tokyo when I visit? Also, did you guys buy the games online or where did you find the games themselves?
    Now, my Japanese is pretty good and all, but I think that someone who knows none of the language will be able to navigate the DSi interface with little problem. If nothing else, just by trial and error, but there are lots of pictures for the icons and it's pretty logically laid out. The games themselves aren't region locked, but you'll be stuck on the Japanese download store if you care about that.

    Very, very, very, very few DS games base their language on your system language, and all of those games have language options that you can manually change when you start it.
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  13. #33
    Senior Member Johonasen's Avatar
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    Default Re: japanese study on the DS

    Not to change the subject ...but what is a program that you'd recommend for someone that dosn't have a DS and is a beginner?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johonasen View Post
    Not to change the subject ...but what is a program that you'd recommend for someone that dosn't have a DS and is a beginner?
    Have you learned hiragana and katakana yet? If not, do so. A simple google search for like "learn hiragana" will do you fine.

    Also, pick up Anki. It's an adaptive flashcard program. You can make any sort of decks you want...you could even start by making some hiragana flashcards with it, having the hiragana on the front side and the reading on the back.

    Do note: (and I apologize in advance if you already learned kana and thus this is totally unnecessary) that らりるれろ is not "ra ri ru re ro"; basically, move your mouth like "r" but your tongue like "l" and you'll get the right sound. Similarly, ふ is not "fu"...but it's close. Just ease up on the bottom lip, which softens it a touch in the "h" direction. Like, the air is going maybe more forward and less over the bottom lip. Also, the がぎぐげご series has a touch of an "n" sound in front; don't make it too sharp. Remember that Japanese doesn't really stress particular syllables. (I'm probably getting this wrong from a proper linguistic perspective, but I'm trying to give the gist.) Even long syllables aren't louder or anything. Get your pronunciation right from the get-go. Listen to anything in Japanese that you can to try to build a sense for rhythm and tone.

    Slime Forest is a great game for kanji...but I would not recommend it to a beginner. Learn at least a hundred or so kanji the old-fashioned way first, getting used to how to do the subcomponents in the correct order and building an intuitive sense for how kanji go together before you bring that into play.

    For a dictionary, I suggest picking up the freeware "Rikai-chan" plugin for Firefox. Great dictionary, totally free.
    Last edited by Wakatta; January 18th, 2009 at 21:52.

  15. #35
    Senior Member Johonasen's Avatar
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    Default Re: japanese study on the DS

    Thank you, I will look into the programs you've mentioned. As for skill level I'm absolutely clueless. I took Spanish in HS, Arabic in college, and spanish and English are spoken in my home but I stay on the English side

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