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Thread: Japanese verb "bases"

  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by ampersand View Post
    The implicit subject. Though almost never written with kanji anymore, it's 済みません. 済む means "complete", "finish", "come to an end", etc. Etymologically, what won't come to an end is your obligation or debt to the other person. Saying すみませんでした means that said obligation didn't come to an end in the past, but it leaves the future open to the possibility that it will.
    Ahhh, so that's what that means! I had wondered what the technical meaning of すみません was. Someone in college told me it meant, "I wish I did not exist (as I trouble you so)". Or was that ごめんなさい? Anyway. That always sounded pretty odd to me.

    (Edit: I just checked. It seems like ごめんなさい (御免なさい) is basically, "Please forgive me." Sensible, albeit less exciting than a desire to be erased from existence!)

    Quote Originally Posted by ampersand View Post
    Note that none of your 1 to 5 use come or go, which in Japanese are what happen at 4. You've either arrived or you haven't. You've either gone/come (which isn't the same as having left in Japanese) or you haven't. You can convey pretty much all the information you describe, you just don't use 行っている or 来ている to do it.
    Good point! I think I fell into the linguistic version of the "evidence of absence/absence of evidence" trap...just because I don't know the appropriate expressions, I assumed they didn't exist.

  2. #42
    Senior Member ampersand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ampersand View Post
    Now I'll have to extra attention. I don't think I've heard anyone say that, but I'll keep my ears open. Do you hear this a lot?
    Just had Tard-gumi before lunch. We were talking about days and months, so there was much discussion of calendars and what is written on them. It was all 〜が書かれている.
    Last edited by ampersand; December 11th, 2008 at 10:47. Reason: spelling

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wakatta View Post
    Put another way: can anyone fill in the blanks here? With like a single verb? I've put my best guesses below.

    1) "The plumbing is being fixed. The pipes are in pieces, and if you turn on that faucet, you'll get a mug of sludge."
    修理中
    2) "The plumbing is fixed. Go ahead and get some water!"
    直された
    3) "We're going to fix the plumbing." (I call cheating on using some extra construction like つもり! 基本!)
    直す
    4) "That apple is being eaten right now." (Not specifying a person, just saying that it's being eaten. Pure passive.)
    りんごが食べられているところだ
    5) "My God, the apple is devouring that poor kid! It FEEDS!"
    りんごが食べる

  4. #44

    Default Re: Japanese verb "bases"

    Thanks Fred! Coincidentally, I also had this conversation with my JTE today, and that's pretty much what he said.

    One question, though: why not りんごが食べられている? What if anything would that mean? What's the ところだ for?

  5. #45
    Senior Member ampersand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wakatta View Post
    One question, though: why not りんごが食べられている? What if anything would that mean? What's the ところだ for?
    ところ is 所 and literally means "place", but it gets used figuratively the way "point" or "part" do in English. To me it seems kind of weird to use it without another clause in the sentence or context for the sentence, like 何々があった時、りんごが食べられているところだった. "When something occurred, the apple was being eaten." It's literally "[At] the time when something happened, [it] was the place (or part or point) where the apple is [tense is relative--at that point it was still happening] being eaten."

    If you just want to convey that the apple is being eaten, it's not necessary.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Mindflux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wakatta View Post
    Ahhh, so that's what that means! I had wondered what the technical meaning of すみません was. Someone in college told me it meant, "I wish I did not exist (as I trouble you so)". Or was that ごめんなさい? Anyway. That always sounded pretty odd to me.
    They were misinterpreting すみません (済む) as すむ (住む) "be going to live" as in: 大阪に住んでいます "I live in Osaka", 大阪に住みません "I will not have lived in Osaka" (maybe, I've never heard 住む used as a negative.)
    I was actually wondering whether or not those two were related the other week since "not going to live" seemed uninterpretable as an apology.
    The definition I pulled up for 済む is "To finish, to be at ease, to be less severe than expected" making 済みません "To feel uneasy or guilty." Which makes much more sense.

  7. #47
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
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    Default Re: Japanese verb "bases"

    I was watching a show last night and one guy said, もう済んだ in reference to ones dinner as he took her plate and threw it out the window.
    <a href=http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3134&dateline=1245615339 target=_blank>http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.ph...ine=1245615339</a>
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  8. #48
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    Sorry if anyone has already mentioned it, but i didn't spot it.

    For saying you are on your way somewhere, there is a Japanese equivalent of 'on the way'.

    途中 とちゅう
    On the way, in the middle of doing something else


    (今)途中です。
    I'm on my way (now).

    もう途中です。
    I'm on my way/ I've already started/ I've already set out.

    このバスはB町まで参ります。途中でお降りのご乗車はチャイムでお知らせください。
    This is the bus for B town. Passengers who wish to alight along the way, please ring the bell.

    お話の途中ですみませんが。。。
    Sorry for interrupting your conversation but...

    途中 has a lot of uses and I'm still getting the hang of it myself, so you'll have to forgive the small number of examples.

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by AliDimayev View Post
    oh, tabere, may be like the (slang) form tabereru "to be able to eat"

    Though, the correct version shoudl be taberareru
    I know up in Hokkaido they say "tabere" instead of "tabeyoo"

  10. #50
    Cool Cutie Fighter! Hyakuman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baikinman View Post
    このバスはB町まで参ります。途中でお降りのご乗客はチャイムでお知らせください。
    This is the bus for B town. Passengers who wish to alight along the way, please ring the bell.
    corrected that for you. but i'm sure they would say お客様 instead since it's more personal than ご乗客 in this case. although this is just using logic. japanese people are not logical.

  11. #51
    Delicious...and moist! kiwimusume's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dawg View Post
    corrected that for you. but i'm sure they would say お客様 instead since it's more personal than ご乗客 in this case. although this is just using logic. japanese people are not logical.
    I think they say お降りの方. That's what they say in my area, anyway.
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    Yeah, it's really good stuff. For some reason, they bound it as a book, instead of on a roll. There's 190 pages, which is probably good for at least a few dozen shits.

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