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Thread: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

  1. #1

    Default How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    Similar to "Take Care" or "Have a nice day"...

    I'm looking for a Well-Wisher rather than Farewell or Closing?

    Also, what's an informal way of saying "hi" other than "Oi". Ohayo/Konnichi wa/Konban wa is getting repetitive for me.

  2. #2

    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    お元気で。 is pretty much "take care". (There's also おだいじに, but that's more for like a person who's actually sick, as far as I can tell.) I don't hear it very often, though. The whole room once burst into laughter when I used it.

    I'm clueless on the informal way of saying hi. I mean, you could おす someone, but that's pretty narrow in terms of usage. I think we might be getting into the realm of English and Japanese having different greeting practices.

  3. #3
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
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    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    i remember erading, too, how teh japanese pretty much dont say 'have a good day' or a good weekend or the like
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
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    Senior Member ampersand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oonter View Post
    Also, what's an informal way of saying "hi" other than "Oi". Ohayo/Konnichi wa/Konban wa is getting repetitive for me.
    Suck it up. While there are other options, they tend to be either regionalisms, possibly dialect, or very informal. How many ways to greet someone do you need?

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    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ampersand View Post
    Suck it up. While there are other options, they tend to be either regionalisms, possibly dialect, or very informal. How many ways to greet someone do you need?
    Hello
    Good Morning
    What's up?
    What up?
    What up, G?
    What up, nigger?
    What up, nigga'?
    How's it going?
    How's your balls?
    How's it hanging?
    Wa'tup?
    Yo.
    Hey, man.
    Hey.
    'Ello.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by ampersand View Post
    Suck it up. While there are other options, they tend to be either regionalisms, possibly dialect, or very informal. How many ways to greet someone do you need?
    1,002 to be exact

  7. #7

    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    気をつけて is something I very often hear when people are leaving. It's equivalent to "Take care". (I live in Kagawa and perhaps it's not used as often in other areas.) I haven't heard 'o genki de' very often. It usually comes up when Japanese people switch to "standard" correct Japanese for the foreigner's (my) 'benefit'. If you want to say some other sort of farewell, you can reference the season or something from the conversation about their future plans and comment on them. So if a trip is coming up "楽しんでください". If it's winter and the flu is going around "風邪を引かないで". If they are going to go to an onsen after having worked hard "ゆっくり休んでください". Or maybe a test is coming up "がんばってください”. So not just one set greeting here, but just general situation specific well-wishing.

    For good morning, etc., you are pretty much stuck with those. Every day when students come to and leave school it's 'ohayo gozaimasu' and 'sayounara'. When I run into people on the street it's the appropriate greeting for that time of day 'ohayo gozaimasu' 'konnichiwa' 'konbanwa'. Sometimes 'konnichiwa' gets used even when it's morning or night. The gozaimasu sometimes gets dropped if it's an older person talking to me.

    A funny way to say 'hi' that's more of an attention-getter is 'yaho---' ’ヤッホー’ made popular recently by a comedic duo on TV.

    I'll try to listen more when I'm out and about to see if there are other greetings that young people use. But as far as the adult, working population, I don't think you'll find any different 'hello' greetings unless they are dialectal. (Goodbye greetings are a different story, but you seem to be OK on that end.)

    ほんだらな

  8. #8
    SPACE MONKEY MAFIA vdog's Avatar
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    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    I'd have to agree with 気をつけて (ki o tukete). However be careful of the context you use it in. It can mean "take care" as much as it can mean to "be careful" or "watch out" for something. Can't really think of an example, but I'm sure there are some situations where it would come out wrong.

    When I was in Japan this seemed to be the good farewell phrase for people that I almost certainly would not meet again. Random Japanese people wanting to talk on the train or in the museums. Friends that I regularly met with would of course say "mata ne" or "zya mata" most, but not all, of the time. But I remember before I went to Mt. Fuji I got a lot of "ki o tukete" which was probably more a case of the "be careful" meaning rather than "take care"
    Last edited by vdog; January 3rd, 2009 at 16:21.

  9. #9

    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    Yeah, the meaning can change with the situation. Like if it looks like you're going to drop something or you're about to walk through a low doorway, it means watch out or be careful. You can say specifically なになに に気をつけて。Be careful of such and such. I think maybe 気をつけて used as a way to say goodbye is limited to when embarked on some sort of travel whether it's a voyage or just going home for the day. So, if you run into someone in a store and you both plan to continue shopping, you wouldn't use it. But if you run into someone as your both leaving, then you would.

    Thanks for bringing up that distinction. I hadn't really thought about it before.

  10. #10

    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    お元気で seems to used when you are parting and won't see each other for a long time. I don't think I've ever heard anyone say that casually.

    You kind of just have to get used to the differences. One of the biggest things that will make your Japanese better (or a Japanese person's English better) is to stop trying to directly translate everything. My adult eikaiwa are always asking me how say yoroshiku onegaishimasu or some other set phrase, and I always just tell them to remember we don't use so many of these in English.

    There are certain things that just don't translate or sound bizarre in the other language. I think "have a nice day" etc. just don't really work.

  11. #11
    Delicious...and moist! kiwimusume's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patjs View Post
    One of the biggest things that will make your Japanese better (or a Japanese person's English better) is to stop trying to directly translate everything.
    +1. Just listen to what people are saying to you or to each other.
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    SPACE MONKEY MAFIA vdog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiwimusume View Post
    +1. Just listen to what people are saying to you or to each other.
    But still try to learn the gender differences and the honorific levels. You don't want to go around sounding like a condescending 60 year old woman! In seriousness though that is very good advice, the fewer English thoughts you have during a Japanese conversation the better. Even if you get very fast at quickly translating in your head it will still never be faster than being able to think in Japanese.

  13. #13
    Senior Member ampersand's Avatar
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    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    +3. There's a reason these sorts of things are called "ritual phrases". You just have to understand them in context. If you attach English equivalents to them, you'll just end up misusing them.

  14. #14
    SPACE MONKEY MAFIA vdog's Avatar
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    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    There are certain things that just don't translate or sound bizarre in the other language. I think "have a nice day" etc. just don't really work.
    Next time a Japanese person asks me how to say one of their ritual phrases in English I'm going to throw a いい日があって to show that some stuff just doesn't translate directly.

  15. #15
    OPPORTUNITYISNOWHERE mteacher80's Avatar
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    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    yoi ichinich wo 良い一日を is a good japanese saying for have a nice day, but usually it is only said in the morning.

    yoi tabi wo 良い旅を for have a safe trip
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  16. #16
    SPACE MONKEY MAFIA vdog's Avatar
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    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    Can you actually say "yoi" without sounding stiff? I was under the impression it was more of a written style thing.

  17. #17
    Senior Member ampersand's Avatar
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    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    In very formal settings you can, but, yeah, usually 良いis pronounced いい.

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    OPPORTUNITYISNOWHERE mteacher80's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ampersand View Post
    In very formal settings you can, but, yeah, usually 良いis pronounced いい.
    in this instance is usually said yoi but either work
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    Senior Member jonesinjapan's Avatar
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    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    I always say the usual Ohayo, Konnichiwa, and Konbanwa for greetings but I was taught for a really informal good-bye, just say ja'ne (SP) I wouldnt use that for work but after talking to friends or walking home with my students, I would normally use ja'ne and it seems to work just fine.
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  20. #20
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
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    Default Re: How dyou wish well in Japanese?

    Take care can also be:

    o-genki de
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

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